calcium phosphate

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calcium phosphate

n.
1. A white amorphous powder, Ca3(PO4)2, used in ceramics, rubber, fertilizers, and plastic stabilizers and as a food supplement.
2. A dibasic white crystalline powder, CaHPO4, used as an animal food, as a plastic stabilizer, and in glass and toothpaste.
3. A monobasic colorless deliquescent powder, Ca(H2PO4)2, used in baking powders, as a plant food, as a plastic stabilizer, and in glass.

calcium phosphate

n
1. (Elements & Compounds) the insoluble nonacid calcium salt of orthophosphoric acid (phosphoric(V) acid): it occurs in bones and is the main constituent of bone ash. Formula: Ca3(PO4)2
2. (Elements & Compounds) any calcium salt of a phosphoric acid. Calcium phosphates are found in many rocks and used esp in fertilizers

cal′cium phos′phate


n.
a phosphate of calcium, used as a fertilizer, food additive, and in baking powder.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.calcium phosphate - a phosphate of calcium; a main constituent of animal bones
inorganic phosphate, orthophosphate, phosphate - a salt of phosphoric acid
References in periodicals archive ?
Both of these problems can be reduced by adding calcium phosphates into the calcium sulfate cements.
Some Aspects of Calcium Phosphates Scaffolds Investigation by X-ray Microtomography: Sergej M.
Because HA is the most alkaline salt among all calcium phosphates that can be prepared in an aqueous system, a larger amount of acid is needed to prepare HA saturated solutions compared to saturated solutions of other calcium phosphates.
Chow (1969-present) Calcium phosphates, solution chemistry, biomincralization, calcium phosphate biomaterials, dental caries.
The conference will focus on bioceramics, such as calcium phosphates and hydroxyapatite technology; an indispensable biomaterials in clinical practice.
In the early 1980s, Brown and Chow of the American Dental Association Health Foundation Paffenbarger Research Center (ADAHF-PRC) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) conducted studies on calcium phosphates aimed at developing remineralizing pastes to repair early dental carious lesions.
Under the Company's research program, micro-thin films of calcium phosphates were deposited on a layer of ultra-thin Hydroxyapatite (HAp) as a vehicle for drug delivery purposes for a variety of implantable medical devices.
Structural features of some calcium phosphates of biological interest are described.
The improved compressive strength is not compromised by the downside of long-term extravasation complications seen with competitive calcium phosphates.
The lead article, "Dental Applications of Amorphous Calcium Phosphates," authored by Dr.