dunlin

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dun·lin

 (dŭn′lĭn)
n.
A rust-brown and white sandpiper (Calidris alpina) that breeds in northern regions of North America and Eurasia.

dunlin

(ˈdʌnlɪn)
n
(Animals) a small sandpiper, Calidris (or Erolia) alpina, of northern and arctic regions, having a brown back and black breast in summer. Also called: red-backed sandpiper
[C16: dun2 + -ling1]

dun•lin

(ˈdʌn lɪn)

n.
a small sandpiper, Calidris alpina, that breeds in the N parts of the Northern Hemisphere.
[1525–35; variant of dunling]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dunlin - small common sandpiper that breeds in northern or Arctic regions and winters in southern United States or Mediterranean regionsdunlin - small common sandpiper that breeds in northern or Arctic regions and winters in southern United States or Mediterranean regions
sandpiper - any of numerous usually small wading birds having a slender bill and piping call; closely related to the plovers
Erolia, genus Erolia - a genus of Scolopacidae

dunlin

noun
Related words
collective noun flight
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: Dunlin, Calidris alpina, Alaska, Bering Sea, migration, staging, shorebird
The ancient and distinctive mtDNA lineage present in birds breeding in central Arctic Canada provides a firm basis for their recognition as a separate subspecies Calidris alpina hudsonia, in line with earlier suggestions based on their geographic separation (Todd 1953; Maclean and Holmes 1971; Browning 1977; Greenwood 1986).
targeting an improvement in the conservation status of several Annex I-listed habitats, namely; coastal habitats, dunes, wetlands and grasslands;-To secure the favourable conservation status of several important breeding bird species: Dunlin (Baltic subspecies), Calidris alpina schinzii Avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta) Wood sandpiper (Tringa glareola) Arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea) Little tern Sterna (Sternula) albifrons ;
We found similar correlations between pitfall catches and growth rate of chicks of dunlin Calidris alpina and little stint Calidris minuta at our study site during this study.
Similarly, work on dunlin Calidris alpina in Denmark has revealed that good population estimates (but still just 70-90% of the pairs) are obtained only if the highest number of pairs and single individuals (the latter counting as one pair each) obtained from 8 to 10 surveys is used (Thorup, 1998; see also Jackson and Percival, 1983).