californium

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cal·i·for·ni·um

 (kăl′ə-fôr′nē-əm)
n. Symbol Cf
A synthetic transuranic element having isotopes with mass numbers from 237 to 256 and half-lives varying from 21 milliseconds to 898 years. All isotopes are radioactive, chiefly by emission of alpha particles, and Cf-252 is a potent neutron emitter. Atomic number 98; melting point 900°C; specific gravity 15.1; valence 3. See Periodic Table.

[After California.]

californium

(ˌkælɪˈfɔːnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a metallic transuranic element artificially produced from curium. Symbol: Cf; atomic no: 98; half-life of most stable isotope, 251Cf: 800 years (approx.)
[C20: New Latin; discovered at the University of California]

cal•i•for•ni•um

(ˌkæl əˈfɔr ni əm)

n.
a transuranic element. Symbol: Cf; at. no.: 98.
[1945–50; after California]

cal·i·for·ni·um

(kăl′ə-fôr′nē-əm)
Symbol Cf A synthetic, radioactive metallic element of the actinide series that is produced from curium or berkelium. Californium emits a large number of neutrons and is used in the analysis of chemical components of substances. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of 800 years. Atomic number 98. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.californium - a radioactive transuranic elementcalifornium - a radioactive transuranic element; discovered by bombarding curium with alpha particles
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
Translations
californium

californium

[ˌkælɪˈfɔːnɪəm] Ncalifornio m
References in periodicals archive ?
In response to customer concerns about the supply of californium-252, this new model enables customers to choose the source of neutrons, not only at the time of purchase, but at any subsequent time in the life of the product.
Ramayya of Vanderbilt University in Nashville and his collaborators have discovered that, in addition to normal spontaneous fission, the isotope californium-252 occasionally splits in two in such a way that no neutrons are released.
The key step involves using an essentially nondestructive form of mass spectrometry based on the radioactive isotope californium-252.