Calvinism

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Cal·vin·ism

 (kăl′vĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
The religious doctrines of John Calvin, emphasizing the omnipotence of God and the salvation of the elect by God's grace alone.

Cal′vin·ist adj. & n.
Cal′vin·is′tic adj.
Cal′vin·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

Calvinism

(ˈkælvɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Theology) the theological system of John Calvin and his followers, characterized by emphasis on the doctrines of predestination, the irresistibility of grace, and justification by faith
ˈCalvinist n, adj
ˌCalvinˈistic, ˌCalvinˈistical adj

Cal•vin•ism

(ˈkæl vəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrines and teachings of John Calvin or his followers, emphasizing predestination, supreme authority of the Scriptures, and irresistibility of grace.
2. adherence to these doctrines.
[1560–70]
Cal′vin•ist, n., adj.
Cal`vin•is′tic, adj.
Cal•vin•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Calvinism

1. the doctrines of John Calvin or his followers, especially emphasis upon predestination and limited atonement, the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures and the irresistibility of grace.
2. adherence to these doctrines. Also called Genevanism. Cf. Arminianism. — Calvinist, n., adj. — Calvinistic, Calvinistical, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Calvinism - the theological system of John Calvin and his followers emphasizing omnipotence of God and salvation by grace alone
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Translations
kalvinismi
kalvinizam
kalwinizm

Calvinism

[ˈkælvɪnɪzəm] Ncalvinismo m

Calvinism

nCalvinismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
The reader wonders whether she really leaves her Calvinism behind as van Herk claims, "I am that ethnic being talked about, that stupidly stubborn and Calvinistically motivated Dutch woman" (Verduyn 1998, 78).
These Scots Presbyterians were already Calvinistically inclined and possessed biblical literacy that made it possible for them seamlessly to discover and interweave biblical references in narratives of their experiences.
In "Reading Hebrew Melodies," David Ben-Merre offers a striking reading of Byron's poetry and cultural politics, arguing that the poet sought a new understanding of the East through verse that would create a metaphorical bridge between ostensibly disparate civilizations, mediating between Jewish nationalism and Calvinistically inclined readings of the Old Testament.