Calvino


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Cal·vi·no

 (kăl-vē′nō, käl-), Italo 1923-1985.
Italian writer of allegorical tales, such as The Nonexistent Knight (1951), and science fiction, including Cosmicomics (1965).

Calvino

(kælˈviːnəʊ)
n
(Biography) Italo. 1923–85, Italian novelist and short-story writer. His works include Our Ancestors (1960) and Invisible Cities (1972)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Calvino - Italian writer of novels and short stories (born in Cuba) (1923-1987)
References in periodicals archive ?
For me, this is a perfect example of what a great writer and a reader Calvino was.
Calvino, President and Chief Executive Officer of Boreas.
North American readers are familiar with the work of Italo Calvino primarily because of his fiction.
There were some notable results in both competitions, not least Zoe Smith confirming her place at the World Seniors in November and Jo Calvino incredibly winning her 20th consecutive title.
Le citta invisibili di Calvino e stato oggetto privilegiato della critica sin dalla sua pubblicazione nel 1972.
Late for work again, Lou Calvino receives an ominous warning from his boss, Jack Walensky, chief editor of the Westridge Tribune.
halo Calvino once argued that writers had to "set themselves tasks that no one else dares imagine.
The primary image that Calvino uses to demonstrate his idea of lightness in literature is Ovid's image of Perseus with the head of the slain Medusa.
Calvino Rabeni suggested online that the percentage of a human's biomass composed of microbes would be a more telling number, to which Scott Linford replied, "More telling in what way?
Nestled amid nods to Wittgenstein and Calvino are literal red herrings and games of Scrabble and the sense that the whole thing is based on some underlying Oulipo-style constraint (although I never found that suspicion distracting).
of Oxford, England) present a selection of the correspondence of Italian journalist, novelist, and short story writer Italo Calvino (1923-1985).
Instead, the rich comparative offerings here take up Dante, Vladimir Nabokov, and Italo Calvino.