Cambrian Explosion


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Related to Cambrian Explosion: Burgess Shale

Cambrian Explosion

n.
The rapid diversification of multicellular animal life around the beginning of the Cambrian Period, resulting in the appearance of almost all modern animal phyla.

Cambrian Explosion

The rapid diversification of multicellular animal life that took place around the beginning of the Cambrian Period. It resulted in the appearance of almost all modern animal phyla. See Note at Burgess Shale.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Japanese scientists believe our ocean-dwelling cousins can be traced back to the Cambrian explosion, a surge in evolution which happened 550million years ago.
That's because, just about 260 million years after the era's end, the Cambrian explosion produced a riot of complex animals.
Meyer's book, which argues for intelligent design (ID) from evidence of the great Cambrian explosion, an eruption of biological information in Earth's ancient seas, 530 million years ago.
In her Cambrian Explosion series, the firing covers most of the pieces' surfaces with a rough matte surface.
It said, "The startup sector worldwide is undergoing a Cambrian explosion, with the low cost an ubiquity of building blocks necessary for tech startups leading to more entrepreneurs tackling billion dollar markets than at any time in history.
The last section briefly details the author's theory on epigenetic mechanisms in evolution and the Cambrian explosion.
He said: "The Cambrian Explosion is one of the most important events in the history of life on our planet.
Research published in Current Biology found that the Cambrian explosion (http://www.
These seemingly impossibly fast rates of evolution implied by this Cambrian explosion have long been exploited by opponents of evolution.
In The Cambrian Explosion 001, one of four faux-textbook illustrations on papyrus shown here, a photo of a dolphin equipped by the US military with a digital camera--itself revealing an erosion of the boundary between biological and technological--is overlaid with images of digital cameras, like so many variations of a species.
Paleontologist Jean-Bernard Caron explores the origins of present-day biodiversity in the Burgess Shale, the Canadian Rocky Mountains fossil record of the Cambrian explosion of life more than 500 million years ago.
While I am aware that there have been innumerable pit disasters in Wales over the past century or so, I was surprised that no mention was made of the Cambrian explosion in 1965 that killed 31 miners and no mention either of the 1960 Six Bells explosion.