Cambridge


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Cam·bridge

 (kām′brĭj)
1. A city of east-central England north-northeast of London. It is the site of the University of Cambridge, established in the 1200s.
2. A city of eastern Massachusetts on the Charles River opposite Boston. Settled in 1630 as New Towne, it is known for its research and educational facilities, including Harvard University (founded in 1636), Radcliffe College (founded 1879, now part of Harvard), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1861).

Cambridge

(ˈkeɪmbrɪdʒ)
n
1. (Placename) a city in E England, administrative centre of Cambridgeshire, on the River Cam: centred around the university, founded in the 12th century: electronics, biotechnology. Pop: 117 717 (2001). Medieval Latin name: Cantabrigia
2. (Placename) short for Cambridgeshire
3. (Placename) a city in the US, in E Massachusetts: educational centre, with Harvard University (1636) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Pop: 101 587 (2003 est)

Cam•bridge

(ˈkeɪm brɪdʒ)

n.
1. a city in Cambridgeshire, in E England: famous university founded in 12th century. 113,800.
2. a city in E Massachusetts, near Boston. 90,290.
4. a city in SE Ontario, in S Canada. 79,920.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cambridge - a university in England
Cambridge - a city in eastern England on the River Cam; site of Cambridge University
2.Cambridge - a city in Massachusetts just to the north of Boston; site of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Harvard, Harvard University - a university in Massachusetts
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT - an engineering university in Cambridge
Bay State, Massachusetts, Old Colony, MA - a state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies
3.Cambridge - a city in eastern England on the River Cam; site of Cambridge University
Cambridge, Cambridge University - a university in England
England - a division of the United Kingdom
Cantabrigian - a resident of Cambridge
Translations
Cambridge

Cambridge

nCambridge nt
References in classic literature ?
The folk in Cambridge often gloated on the spectacle of Longfellow and Lowell arm in arm.
A certain portion of his time was passed at Cambridge, where he read with undergraduates as a sort of tolerated smuggler who drove a contraband trade in European languages, instead of conveying Greek and Latin through the Custom-house.
Pocket had been educated at Harrow and at Cambridge, where he had distinguished himself; but that when he had had the happiness of marrying Mrs.
The whole resembled the form of the letter T, or some of those ancient dinner-tables, which, arranged on the same principles, may be still seen in the antique Colleges of Oxford or Cambridge.
The sixth form consisted of four studious young ladies, whose goal in life for the present was an examination by one of the Universities, or, as the college phrase was, "the Cambridge Local.
He sent me to Emanuel College in Cambridge at fourteen years old, where I resided three years, and applied myself close to my studies; but the charge of maintaining me, although I had a very scanty allowance, being too great for a narrow fortune, I was bound apprentice to Mr.
At Cambridge he had spent a great deal of his time working in the laboratory, and had taken a good class in the Natural Science Tripos of his year.
Hubbard first became aware of Bell's inventive efforts one evening when Bell was visiting at his home in Cambridge.
Can we imagine that the electors who reside in the remote subdivisions of the counties of Albany, Saratoga, Cambridge, etc.
Others had come from the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge, where they had gained great fame for their learning.
My plan was laid at Westminster, a little altered, perhaps, at Cambridge, and at one-and-twenty executed.
They pointed out the fish and dead birds lying about among the rocks as proving the nature of the food of these creatures, and I heard them congratulating each other on having cleared up the point why the bones of this flying dragon are found in such great numbers in certain well-defined areas, as in the Cambridge Green-sand, since it was now seen that, like penguins, they lived in gregarious fashion.

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