Canadian


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Canada

Can·a·da

 (kăn′ə-də)
A country of northern North America. The original inhabitants of the region include the Inuit and First Nations. European colonists arrived in eastern Canada in the early 1600s, and the area was claimed by the French and then ceded (1763) to the English after the Seven Years' War. Confederation of the territories and provinces of British North America, which eventually included all land north of the United States, began in 1867 and ended with the addition of Newfoundland in 1949. The Statute of Westminster (1931) confirmed Canada's status as an independent Dominion within the Commonwealth. Ottawa is the capital and Toronto the largest city.

Ca·na′di·an (kə-nā′dē-ən) adj. & n.
Word History: Linguistically, mountains can be made out of molehills, so to speak: words denoting a small thing can, over time, come to denote something much larger. This is the case with Canada, now the name of the second-largest country in the world but having a much humbler origin. Apparently its history starts with the word kanata, which in Huron (an Iroquoian language of eastern Canada) meant "village." Jacques Cartier, the early French explorer, picked up the word and used it to refer to the land around his settlement, now part of Quebec City. By the 18th century it referred to all of New France, which extended from the St. Lawrence River to the Great Lakes and down into what is now the American Midwest. In 1759, the British conquered New France and used the name Quebec for the colony north of the St. Lawrence River, and Canada for the rest of the territory. Eventually, as the territory increased in size and the present arrangement of the provinces developed, Canada applied to all the land north of the United States and east of Alaska.

Canadian

(kəˈneɪdɪən)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Canada or its people
n
(Placename) a native, citizen, or inhabitant of Canada

Ca•na•di•an

(kəˈneɪ di ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Canada or its inhabitants.
n.
2. a native or inhabitant of Canada.
[1560–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Canadian - a native or inhabitant of CanadaCanadian - a native or inhabitant of Canada  
Canada - a nation in northern North America; the French were the first Europeans to settle in mainland Canada; "the border between the United States and Canada is the longest unguarded border in the world"
French Canadian - a Canadian descended from early French settlers and whose native language is French
North American - a native or inhabitant of North America
bluenose, Nova Scotian - a native or inhabitant of Nova Scotia
Quebecois - a native or inhabitant of Quebec (especially one who speaks French)
2.Canadian - a river rising in northeastern New Mexico and flowing eastward across the Texas panhandle to become a tributary of the Arkansas River in OklahomaCanadian - a river rising in northeastern New Mexico and flowing eastward across the Texas panhandle to become a tributary of the Arkansas River in Oklahoma
Land of Enchantment, New Mexico, NM - a state in southwestern United States on the Mexican border
OK, Oklahoma, Sooner State - a state in south central United States
Lone-Star State, Texas, TX - the second largest state; located in southwestern United States on the Gulf of Mexico
Adj.1.Canadian - of or relating to Canada or its people
Translations
Kanaďankanadský
canadiercanadisk
kanada
kanadalainen
Kanađaninkanadski
kanadai
カナダのカナダ人
캐나다 사람캐나다의
canadian
kanadensiskkanadensare
เกี่ยวกับประเทศแคนาดาชาวแคนาดา
канадецьканадієцьканадійськийканадський
người Canadathuộc nước/người Canada

Canadian

[kəˈneɪdɪən]
A. ADJcanadiense
B. Ncanadiense mf

Canadian

[kəˈneɪdiən]
adjcanadien(ne)
nCanadien(ne) m/fCanadian French n (= language) → français m du Canada

Canadian

adjkanadisch
nKanadier(in) m(f)

Canadian

[kəˈneɪdɪən] adj & ncanadese (m/f)

Canadian

كَنَدِيّ Kanaďan, kanadský canadier, canadisk Kanadier, kanadisch καναδικός, Καναδός canadiense kanadalainen Canadien Kanađanin, kanadski canadese カナダの, カナダ人 캐나다 사람, 캐나다의 Canadees kanadier, kanadisk Kanadyjczyk, kanadyjski canadense, canadiano канадец, канадский kanadensare, kanadensisk เกี่ยวกับประเทศแคนาดา, ชาวแคนาดา Kanada, Kanadalı người Canada, thuộc nước/người Canada 加拿大人, 加拿大的
References in classic literature ?
He is said to be a Canadian too; and yet he served with our friends the Mohawks, who, as you know, are one of the six allied nations.
Whereas, in the days of the old Canadian and Indian hunters and trappers of the West, when the far west (in whose sunset suns still rise) was a wilderness and a virgin, the same number of moccasined men, for the same number of months, mounted on horse instead of sailing in ships, would have slain not forty, but forty thousand and more buffaloes; a fact that, if need were, could be statistically stated.
The note-book of a missionary, among the Canadian fugitives, contains truth stranger than fiction.
Known from the Canadian border to the deserts of Arizona, and from the eastern marches of the Great Plains to the foot-hills of the Sierra
My wretched feet, flayed and swollen to lameness by the sharp air of January, began to heal and subside under the gentler breathings of April; the nights and mornings no longer by their Canadian temperature froze the very blood in our veins; we could now endure the play-hour passed in the garden: sometimes on a sunny day it began even to be pleasant and genial, and a greenness grew over those brown beds, which, freshening daily, suggested the thought that Hope traversed them at night, and left each morning brighter traces of her steps.
And so, to save his life, he and his father and mother set sail from Glasgow and came to the small Canadian town of Brantford, where for a year he fought down his tendency to consumption, and satisfied his nervous energy by teaching "Visible Speech" to a tribe of Mohawk Indians.
Ned Land was a Canadian, with an uncommon quickness of hand, and who knew no equal in his dangerous occupation.
In equipping the two kinds of trappers, the Creole and Canadian are apt to prefer the light fusee; the American always grasps his rifle; he despises what he calls the "shot-gun.
You shall have something," said he, "for you ought to feel disposed for refreshment after walking nobody knows how far on such a Canadian night as this; but it shall not be brandy-and-water, and it shall not be a bottle of port, nor ditto of sherry.
It was the fur trade, in fact, which gave early sustenance and vitality to the great Canadian provinces.
The stories in it are not half as interesting as those in the Canadian Woman, although it costs so much more.
And if inspiration comes from beauty, I should certainly be able to begin my great Canadian novel here.

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