Canadian


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Canada

Can·a·da

 (kăn′ə-də)
A country of northern North America. The original inhabitants of the region include the Inuit and First Nations. European colonists arrived in eastern Canada in the early 1600s, and the area was claimed by the French and then ceded (1763) to the English after the Seven Years' War. Confederation of the territories and provinces of British North America, which eventually included all land north of the United States, began in 1867 and ended with the addition of Newfoundland in 1949. The Statute of Westminster (1931) confirmed Canada's status as an independent Dominion within the Commonwealth. Ottawa is the capital and Toronto the largest city.

Ca·na′di·an (kə-nā′dē-ən) adj. & n.
Word History: Linguistically, mountains can be made out of molehills, so to speak: words denoting a small thing can, over time, come to denote something much larger. This is the case with Canada, now the name of the second-largest country in the world but having a much humbler origin. Apparently its history starts with the word kanata, which in Huron (an Iroquoian language of eastern Canada) meant "village." Jacques Cartier, the early French explorer, picked up the word and used it to refer to the land around his settlement, now part of Quebec City. By the 18th century it referred to all of New France, which extended from the St. Lawrence River to the Great Lakes and down into what is now the American Midwest. In 1759, the British conquered New France and used the name Quebec for the colony north of the St. Lawrence River, and Canada for the rest of the territory. Eventually, as the territory increased in size and the present arrangement of the provinces developed, Canada applied to all the land north of the United States and east of Alaska.

Canadian

(kəˈneɪdɪən)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Canada or its people
n
(Placename) a native, citizen, or inhabitant of Canada

Ca•na•di•an

(kəˈneɪ di ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Canada or its inhabitants.
n.
2. a native or inhabitant of Canada.
[1560–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Canadian - a native or inhabitant of CanadaCanadian - a native or inhabitant of Canada  
Canada - a nation in northern North America; the French were the first Europeans to settle in mainland Canada; "the border between the United States and Canada is the longest unguarded border in the world"
French Canadian - a Canadian descended from early French settlers and whose native language is French
North American - a native or inhabitant of North America
bluenose, Nova Scotian - a native or inhabitant of Nova Scotia
Quebecois - a native or inhabitant of Quebec (especially one who speaks French)
2.Canadian - a river rising in northeastern New Mexico and flowing eastward across the Texas panhandle to become a tributary of the Arkansas River in OklahomaCanadian - a river rising in northeastern New Mexico and flowing eastward across the Texas panhandle to become a tributary of the Arkansas River in Oklahoma
Land of Enchantment, New Mexico, NM - a state in southwestern United States on the Mexican border
OK, Oklahoma, Sooner State - a state in south central United States
Lone-Star State, Texas, TX - the second largest state; located in southwestern United States on the Gulf of Mexico
Adj.1.Canadian - of or relating to Canada or its people
Translations
Kanaďankanadský
canadiercanadisk
kanada
kanadalainen
Kanađaninkanadski
kanadai
カナダのカナダ人
캐나다 사람캐나다의
canadian
kanadensiskkanadensare
เกี่ยวกับประเทศแคนาดาชาวแคนาดา
канадецьканадієцьканадійськийканадський
người Canadathuộc nước/người Canada

Canadian

[kəˈneɪdɪən]
A. ADJcanadiense
B. Ncanadiense mf

Canadian

[kəˈneɪdiən]
adjcanadien(ne)
nCanadien(ne) m/fCanadian French n (= language) → français m du Canada

Canadian

adjkanadisch
nKanadier(in) m(f)

Canadian

[kəˈneɪdɪən] adj & ncanadese (m/f)

Canadian

كَنَدِيّ Kanaďan, kanadský canadier, canadisk Kanadier, kanadisch καναδικός, Καναδός canadiense kanadalainen Canadien Kanađanin, kanadski canadese カナダの, カナダ人 캐나다 사람, 캐나다의 Canadees kanadier, kanadisk Kanadyjczyk, kanadyjski canadense, canadiano канадец, канадский kanadensare, kanadensisk เกี่ยวกับประเทศแคนาดา, ชาวแคนาดา Kanada, Kanadalı người Canada, thuộc nước/người Canada 加拿大人, 加拿大的
References in classic literature ?
Ned Land was a Canadian, with an uncommon quickness of hand, and who knew no equal in his dangerous occupation.
Who calls himself Canadian calls himself French; and, little communicative as Ned Land was, I must admit that he took a certain liking for me.
He related his fishing, and his combats, with natural poetry of expression; his recital took the form of an epic poem, and I seemed to be listening to a Canadian Homer singing the Iliad of the regions of the North.
Wooden ships--that is possible," replied the Canadian, "but I have never seen it done; and, until further proof, I deny that whales, cetaceans, or sea-unicorns could ever produce the effect you describe.
Yes--certainly--perhaps," replied the Canadian, shaken by these figures, but not yet willing to give in.
Departure of Captain Bonneville for the Columbia Advance of Wyeth Efforts to keep the lead Hudson's Bay party A junketing A delectable beverage Honey and alcohol High carousing The Canadian "bon vivant" A cache A rapid move Wyeth and his plans His travelling companions Buffalo hunting More conviviality An interruption.
They talked over all the events of their late campaigns; but the Canadian veteran had been unlucky in some of his transactions; and his brow began to grow cloudy.
He was, in fact, a boon companion; as all veteran Canadian traders are apt to be.
It was the fur trade, in fact, which gave early sustenance and vitality to the great Canadian provinces.
The Canadian traders, for a long time, had troublesome competitors in the British merchants of New York, who inveigled the Indian hunters and the coureurs des bois to their posts, and traded with them on more favorable terms.
They were wrapped in rich furs, their huge canoes freighted with every convenience and luxury, and manned by Canadian voyageurs, as obedient as Highland clansmen.
While the chiefs thus revelled in hall, and made the rafters resound with bursts of loyalty and old Scottish songs, chanted in voices cracked and sharpened by the northern blast, their merriment was echoed and prolonged by a mongrel legion of retainers, Canadian voyageurs, half-breeds, Indian hunters, and vagabond hangers-on who feasted sumptuously without on the crumbs that fell from their table, and made the welkin ring with old French ditties, mingled with Indian yelps and yellings.

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