carcinogen

(redirected from Cancerogenic)
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Related to Cancerogenic: complete carcinogen

car·cin·o·gen

 (kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kär′sə-nə-jĕn′)
n.
A cancer-causing substance or agent.

car′ci·no·gen′e·sis (kär′sə-nə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs) n.
car′cin·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
car′ci·no·ge·nic′i·ty (-jə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

carcinogen

(kɑːˈsɪnədʒən; ˈkɑːsɪnəˌdʒɛn)
n
(Pathology) pathol any substance that produces cancer
[C20: from Greek karkinos cancer + -gen]
ˌcarcinoˈgenic adj
ˌcarcinogenˈicity n

car•cin•o•gen

(kɑrˈsɪn ə dʒən)

n.
any substance or agent that tends to produce a cancer.
[1935–40; carcino (ma) + -gen]
car`cin•o•gen•ic (-sə nəˈdʒɛn ɪk) adj.
car`ci•no•ge•nic′i•ty (-dʒəˈnɪs ɪ ti) n.

car·cin·o·gen

(kär-sĭn′ə-jən)
A substance or agent that can cause cancer. Asbestos and tobacco products are examples of carcinogens.

carcinogen

any natural or artificial substance that can produce or trigger cancer, as arsenic, asbestos, ionizing radiation, ultraviolet rays, x rays, and many derivatives of coal tar. — carcinogenic, adj.
See also: Cancer

carcinogen

Any cancer-causing agent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carcinogen - any substance that produces cancercarcinogen - any substance that produces cancer  
substance - a particular kind or species of matter with uniform properties; "shigella is one of the most toxic substances known to man"
Translations

carcinogen

[kɑːˈsɪnədʒen] Ncarcinógeno m

carcinogen

[kɑːrˈsɪnədʒən] nsubstance f cancérigène

carcinogen

nKrebserreger m, → Karzinogen nt

carcinogen

[kɑːˈsɪnədʒən] n (Med) → cancerogeno

car·cin·o·gen

n. carcinógeno, cualquier sustancia que puede producir cáncer.

carcinogen

n carcinógeno, cancerígeno, sustancia que causa cáncer
References in periodicals archive ?
Ranges of risk-based consumption limits for 11 sites, calculated in meals per month and based on multiple contaminant exposure with cancerogenic health endpoints, including total PCBs (n = 209), toxaphene and dieldrin.
Both had been classified as "possibly cancerogenic to humans" since 1991, when the last evaluation was done.
MDA not only is a marker for oxidative decomposition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) but also might have important atherogenic, mutagenic, and cancerogenic actions, as it is capable of forming different, biologically relevant DNA and protein adducts [24, 25].
Classification of risk levels Risk Noncancerogenic Cancerogenic CR Risk level HQ (HI) <1.