candida

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can·di·da

 (kăn′dĭ-də)
n.
Any of various fungi of the genus Candida that are found especially on the skin and in the mucous membranes of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina and that may become pathogenic, such as C. albicans, the causative agent of thrush.

[Latin, feminine of candidus, white; see candid.]

candida

(ˈkændɪdə)
n
(Microbiology) any yeastlike parasitic fungus of the genus Candida, esp C. albicans, which causes thrush (candidiasis)
[New Latin, feminine of candidus white]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.candida - any of the yeastlike imperfect fungi of the genus Candida
fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
genus Candida - a genus of yeastlike imperfect fungi; sometimes included in genus Monilia of the family Moniliaceae
Candida albicans, Monilia albicans - a parasitic fungus that can infect the mouth or the skin or the intestines or the vagina
Translations

candida

[ˈkændɪdə] N (Med) → afta f

candida

n (Med) → Candidose f
References in periodicals archive ?
Susceptibility of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to erythrosine-and LED-mediated photodynamic therapy.
Candida Carriage And Candida Dubliniensis In Oropharyngeal Samples Of Type 1 Diabetic Mellitus Patients.
1), (2), (11) One of the newest discovered forms, Candida dubliniensis, has a lot in common with C.
Detection and antifungal susceptibility testing of oral Candida dubliniensis from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.
Identification of Candida dubliniensis based on temperature and utilization of xylose and alpha-methyl-D-glucoside as determined with the API 20C AUX and Vitek YBC systems.
Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic yeast species phenotypically and genetically closely related to C.
Prevalence of Candida dubliniensis fungemia at a large teaching hospital.
Mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis.
We present a case of Candida dubliniensis meningitis that developed 2 months after apparently successful treatment of an episode of C.
We isolated Candida dubliniensis from a nonhuman source, namely, tick samples from an Irish seabird colony.