Cantabrigian


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Related to Cantabrigian: Cantabrigia

Can·ta·brig·i·an

 (kăn′tə-brĭj′ē-ən)
adj.
1. Of or relating to Cambridge, England, or Cambridge, Massachusetts.
2. Of or relating to Cambridge University.
n.
1. A native or resident of Cambridge, England, or Cambridge, Massachusetts.
2. A student or graduate of Cambridge University.

[From Medieval Latin Cantabrigia, Cambridge, England.]

Cantabrigian

(ˌkæntəˈbrɪdʒɪən)
adj
1. (Education) of, relating to, or characteristic of Cambridge or Cambridge University, or of Cambridge, Massachusetts, or Harvard University
2. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of Cambridge or Cambridge University, or of Cambridge, Massachusetts, or Harvard University
n
3. (Education) a member or graduate of Cambridge University or Harvard University
4. (Peoples) an inhabitant or native of Cambridge
[C17: from Medieval Latin Cantabrigia]

Can•ta•brig•i•an

(ˌkæn təˈbrɪdʒ i ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Cambridge, England, or Cambridge University.
2. of or pertaining to Cambridge, Mass., or Harvard University.
n.
3. a native or resident of Cambridge.
4. a student at or graduate of Cambridge University or Harvard University.
[1610–20; < Medieval Latin Cantabrigi(a) Cambridge + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cantabrigian - a resident of Cambridge
Cambridge - a city in eastern England on the River Cam; site of Cambridge University
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
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