Canterbury


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Related to Canterbury: Canterbury Tales

Can·ter·bur·y

 (kăn′tər-bĕr′ē, -brē, -tə-)
A city of southeast England east-southeast of London. Its 11th-century cathedral, the seat of the primate of the Church of England, became an important medieval pilgrimage center after the murder there of Thomas à Becket (1170).

canterbury

(ˈkæntəbərɪ; -brɪ)
n, pl -buries
1. (Furniture) a late 18th-century low wooden stand with partitions for holding cutlery and plates: often mounted on casters
2. (Furniture) a similar 19th-century stand used for holding sheet music, music books, or magazines

Canterbury

(ˈkæntəbərɪ; -brɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a city in SE England, in E Kent: starting point for St Augustine's mission to England (597 ad); cathedral where St Thomas à Becket was martyred (1170); seat of the archbishop and primate of England; seat of the University of Kent (1965). Pop: 43 552 (2001). Latin name: Durovernum
2. (Placename) a regional council area of New Zealand, on E central South Island on Canterbury Bight: mountainous with coastal lowlands; agricultural. Chief town: Christchurch. Pop: 520 500 (2004 est). Area: 43 371 sq km (16 742 sq miles)

Can•ter•bur•y

(ˈkæn tərˌbɛr i, -bə ri; esp. Brit. -bri)

n.
1. a city in E Kent, in SE England: early ecclesiastical center of England. 132,400.
2. a municipality in E New South Wales, in SE Australia: suburb of Sydney. 115,100.
Can`ter•bu′ri•an (-ˈbyʊər i ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Canterbury - a town in Kent in southeastern England; site of the cathedral where Thomas a Becket was martyred in 1170; seat of the archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church
Kent - a county in southeastern England on the English Channel; formerly an Anglo-Saxon kingdom, it was the first to be colonized by the Romans
Translations

Canterbury

[ˈkæntəbərɪ]
A. NCantórbery m
B. CPD Canterbury Tales NPLCuentos mpl de Cantórbery
References in classic literature ?
Notwithstanding a constant application of his one armed heel to the flanks of the mare, the most confirmed gait that he could establish was a Canterbury gallop with the hind legs, in which those more forward assisted for doubtful moments, though generally content to maintain a loping trot.
Her ancient decks were worn and wrinkled, like the pilgrim-worshipped flag-stone in Canterbury Cathedral where Beckett bled.
It was Sunday; yet at Canterbury the streets were empty; strangest of all, there was not even a priest in sight, and no stroke of a bell fell upon my ear.
Lilies o' th' valley does," he answered, digging away with the trowel, "an' there's Canterbury bells, an' campanulas.
The Archbishop of Canterbury gave me his license to be married, and the vicar of Aldborough performed the service.
I have associated it, ever since, with the sunny street of Canterbury, dozing as it were in the hot light; and with the sight of its old houses and gateways, and the stately, grey Cathedral, with the rooks sailing round the towers.
Then, by St Thomas of Canterbury,'' replied Gurth, ``we will have the castle, should we tear it down with our hands
Edwin and Morcar, the earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him: and even Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable--"'
Individuals had come from the rich establishment at Lebanon, from Canterbury, Harvard, and Alfred, and from all the other localities where this strange people have fertilized the rugged hills of New England by their systematic industry.
He watched the deer in Windsor Forest and admired the Thames from Richmond Hill; he ate white-bait and brown-bread and butter at Greenwich, and strolled in the grassy shadow of the cathedral of Canterbury.
He went with him to London, and, with his influence, the young man obtained the license of the Archbishop of Canterbury for a private marriage.
At Canterbury, therefore, we alighted, only to find that we should have to wait an hour before we could get a train to Newhaven.