Canterbury Pilgrims


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Canterbury Pilgrims

pl n
1. (Historical Terms) the pilgrims whose stories are told in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
2. (Historical Terms) NZ the early settlers in Christchurch, Canterbury region
References in periodicals archive ?
The hospital of Blessed Mary of Ospringe, commonly known as "Maison Dieu' was founded in 1230AD to care for the sick and elderly and shelter Canterbury pilgrims.
One of these is a souvenir of a performance in 1958 of the nowadays-neglected cantata The Canterbury Pilgrims by Sir George Dyson.
1) In the present note I wish to draw attention to a leitmotif in the General Prologue that has hitherto been overlooked: the girdles, belts, and cords that bedeck some of the Canterbury pilgrims and are conspicuously absent from the costumes of others.
It begins, "All serious pilgrims go on foot to their holy destinations--Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims stand for so many others.
Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims will not be far from the reader's thoughts as he or she begins Jerusalem in Medieval Narrative.
As detailed by Read, Blake's genius must have been sparked by closely reading The Examiner as it promoted Louis Schiavonetti's engraving of Stothard's painting The Canterbury Pilgrims and Cromek's Chalcographic Society throughout 1810.
The most comprehensive application of Kittredge's principle to the Canterbury pilgrims was that of R.
Chaucer himself draws attention to the importance of 'array' (A 41) for the understanding of the social status, moral condition, and spiritual aspiration of the Canterbury pilgrims.
A veritable God's plenty of Jews they were, compensation perhaps for the fact that plainly none of the 30 Canterbury pilgrims could possibly be Jews.
The Canterbury pilgrims must rank as the dimmest group ever to set foot on the road from Southwark.
All of this depends upon touch: the touch of the Pardoner among the Canterbury pilgrims or of Margery Kempe "showing something disjunctive within unities that are presumed unproblematic, even natural" (151); the touch among contemporaneous texts almost never brought into the same conversation--legal documents like that recounting Rykener's story, religious polemic like that circulating around the Lollards, Chaucer's canonical tales; and the touch of radically different moments--the late Middle Ages with the postmodern moment of Getting Medieval itself.

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