Cape Coloured


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Cape Coloured

n
(Peoples) (formerly, in South Africa) a racial classification under apartheid for people of mixed ethnic origin
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of my looks and my colour I was classified as a Cape Coloured.
D'Oliveira, dubbed a Cape Coloured, built his career in England, firstly in league cricket and then at county and international level.
He recognizes that she is from the Cape Coloured community, and helps her establish a White identity, later having her join his organization.
Australian Aborigines, Maori, Cape Coloured, and Natal Indians and other coloured settlers subscribed to key aspects of the British World culture, yet remained second-zone citizens.
De Villiers had said of the Cape coloured Januarie's performance after coming on as a replacement in the opening Test: "I'm not concerned about his form, he may have made a blunder but so did other players.
He was Cape Coloured and I knew I wouldn't be able to socialise with him as I had at college.
He is humorous, incorrigible, incisive, loud, keenly sensitive to the sufferings of the common man in society, and boldly, honestly, exuberantly vulgar - a Rabelaisian reincarnation in Cape Coloured form who is not prepared to take shit from anyone.
In her essay, "Shame and Identity: The Case of the Coloured in South Africa", Wicomb (1998) takes as her points of departure what she calls the shameful Cape coloured vote for the National Party in the 1994 elections--effectively a vote against non-racial democracy--and the simultaneous resurgence of a Coloured identity politics in which the name 'coloured' was reaffirmed, once again capitalised, and without apologetic scare quotes.
The refusal of the South African authorities to allow D'Oliveira into the country of his birth - he was a Cape coloured, or of mixed race - as part of the England party led to the cancellation of the 1968/9 tour and intensified attention on the fight against apartheid.
They included the Cape Coloured Carnegie Committee, the Society for Book Distribution, and the Cape Libraries Extension Association.
Another factor for the upsurge of writing in Afrikaans could be that the stigma of apartheid that clung to Afrikaans for so long has now slipped somewhat, for previously Cape Coloured writers such as Peter Abrahams and Richard Rive had chosen English as their medium.
Patterson, Colour and Culture in South Africa: A Study of the Status of the Cape Coloured People within the Social Structure of the Union of South Africa (London, 1953), 147-52.