capital expenditure

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Related to Capital investment: venture capital

capital expenditure

n.
1. Funds spent for the acquisition of a long-term asset.
2. An amount of money spent in this way.

capital expenditure

n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) expenditure on acquisitions of or improvements to fixed assets

cap′ital expen′diture


n.
an addition to the value of fixed assets, as by the purchase of a new building.
[1895–1900]

capital expenditure

Spending on fixed assets (such as equipment).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.capital expenditure - the cost of long-term improvements
cost - the total spent for goods or services including money and time and labor
Translations

capital expenditure

nspese fpl in capitale
References in periodicals archive ?
Capital investments in Macedonia doubled in the past five years, while the annual increase since 2005 has stood at 20 percent.
The Middle East and Africa (MEA) attracted a total of 1,530 projects last year, up 16 per cent over the previous year although capital investment was down slightly by 1 per cent.
must be timely paid in order to ensure smooth business operation, capital investment was the first cost to be cut.
The Minister said the funding - which is on top of pounds 170m announced in the past eight months - will enable the delivery of a total capital investment programme in education that exceeds pounds 530m.
The Welsh Assembly Government's Strategic Capital Investment Advisory Panel is chaired by Tim Stone, chairman of KPMG's Global Infrastructure and Projects Group.
The total amount of annual venture capital investments in Arkansas increased nearly threefold from 2000 to 2006, according to the American Electronic Association's annual Cyberstates survey.
That is accomplished, in part, by aligning corporate priorities with the tangible support offered by jurisdictions throughout the world to secure the capital investment and employment that are the foundation for future economic growth.
Capital investments are among the most critical determinants of competitive advantage (Porter, 1992), in that they have long-term implications for firms in their generation of earnings through current and future returns.
Thus, as a result of the BOJ's plodding reactivity since the bursting of the capital investment bubble, the interest rate has seen a truly drastic decline, from 8 percent in the early 1990s to its current rate of zero percent.
Credits are offsets to tax liabilities in response to a capital investment or job creation activity.
Certain companies have learned the intrinsic value of managing their working capital investment rate (defined here, using quarter end data, as accounts receivable-trade plus inventory minus accounts payable-trade, all divided by four times quarterly revenue).

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