captive

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cap·tive

 (kăp′tĭv)
n.
1. One, such as a prisoner of war, who is forcibly confined, subjugated, or enslaved.
2. One held in the grip of a strong emotion or passion.
3. A subsidiary that serves only its parent company.
adj.
1. Taken and held prisoner, as in war.
2. Held in bondage; enslaved.
3. Kept under restraint or control; confined: captive birds.
4. Enraptured, as by beauty; captivated.
5. Restrained by circumstances that prevent free choice: a captive audience; a captive market.
6. Serving a single company exclusively: a captive insurer.

[Middle English captif, from Old French, from Latin captīvus, from captus, past participle of capere, to seize; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

captive

(ˈkæptɪv)
n
1. a person or animal that is confined or restrained, esp a prisoner of war
2. a person whose behaviour is dominated by some emotion: a captive of love.
adj
3. held as prisoner
4. held under restriction or control; confined: captive water held behind a dam.
5. captivated; enraptured
6. unable by circumstances to avoid speeches, advertisements, etc (esp in the phrase captive audience)
[C14: from Latin captīvus, from capere to take]

cap•tive

(ˈkæp tɪv)

n.
1. a prisoner.
2. a person who is enslaved or dominated: a captive of one's own fears.
adj.
3. made or held prisoner, esp. in war.
4. kept in confinement or restraint: captive animals.
5. enslaved by love, beauty, etc.; captivated.
6. unable to avoid listening or attending to something: a captive audience.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin captīvus=capt(us), past participle of capere to take + -īvus -ive]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.captive - a person who is confinedcaptive - a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war
unfortunate, unfortunate person - a person who suffers misfortune
convict, yard bird, yardbird, con, inmate - a person serving a sentence in a jail or prison
detainee, political detainee - some held in custody
hostage, surety - a prisoner who is held by one party to insure that another party will meet specified terms
internee - a person who is interned; "the internees were enemy aliens and suspected terrorists"
political prisoner - someone who is imprisoned because of their political views
POW, prisoner of war - a person who surrenders to (or is taken by) the enemy in time of war
2.captive - an animal that is confined
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
3.captive - a person held in the grip of a strong emotion or passion
emotional person - a person subject to strong states of emotion
Adj.1.captive - being in captivity
unfree - hampered and not free; not able to act at will
2.captive - giving or marked by complete attention to; "that engrossed look or rapt delight"; "then wrapped in dreams"; "so intent on this fantastic...narrative that she hardly stirred"- Walter de la Mare; "rapt with wonder"; "wrapped in thought"
attentive - (often followed by `to') giving care or attention; "attentive to details"; "the nurse was attentive to her patient"; "an attentive suitor"

captive

adjective
1. confined, caged, imprisoned, locked up, enslaved, incarcerated, ensnared, subjugated, penned, restricted Her heart had begun to pound inside her chest like a captive animal.
noun
1. prisoner, hostage, convict, prisoner of war, detainee, internee He described the difficulties of surviving for four months as a captive.
Translations
أسيرأَسيْر، سَبِي
zajateczajatý
fangefangetindespærret
اسير
vanki
zarobljenicazarobljenik
bezártelzártfogoly
fangifanginn, í haldi
belaisvisgrobėjasnelaisvėnelaisvėje laikomaspagauti
gūsteknissagūstīts
zajateczajatý
ujetnik

captive

[ˈkæptɪv]
A. ADJ [animal, bird, person] → cautivo
to take sb captivehacer prisionero a algn
to hold sb captivetener or mantener prisionero or cautivo a algn
he had a captive audiencela gente no tenía más remedio que escucharle
captive marketmercado m cautivo
B. Ncautivo/a m/f, preso/a m/f

captive

[ˈkæptɪv]
adj (= in captivity) [person] → prisonnier/ière; [animal] → captif/ive
ncaptif/ive m/f
to take sb captive → faire qn prisonnier
to hold sb captive → garder qn en captivitécaptive breeding nélevage m en captivitécaptive market nmarché m captif

captive

nGefangene(r) mf; to take somebody captivejdn gefangen nehmen; to hold somebody captivejdn gefangen halten; (fig)jdn fesseln, jdn gefangen nehmen
adj persongefangen; animal, birdin Gefangenschaft; in a captive statein Gefangenschaft f; a captive audienceein unfreiwilliges Publikum; captive breedingZucht f(von artbedrohten Tieren) in Gefangenschaft

captive

[ˈkæptɪv]
1. adj (person) → prigioniero/a; (animal) → in cattività
he had a captive audience → i presenti hanno dovuto ascoltarlo per forza
2. nprigioniero/a
to hold sb captive → tenere prigioniero qn

captive

(ˈkӕptiv) noun
a prisoner. Two of the captives escaped.
adjective
kept prisoner. captive soldiers; The children were taken/held captive.
capˈtivity noun
a state of being a prisoner, caged etc. animals in captivity in a zoo.
ˈcaptor noun
a person who captures someone. He managed to escape from his captors.
ˈcapture (-tʃə) verb
1. to take by force, skill etc. The soldiers captured the castle; Several animals were captured.
2. to take possession of (a person's attention etc). The story captured his imagination.
noun
1. the act of capturing.
2. something caught. A kangaroo was his most recent capture.
References in classic literature ?
She hears him coming and hides, sees him put the potions into two cups of wine and bid the the timid little servant, "Bear them to the captives in their cells, and tell them I shall come anon.
As there was nothing improbable to an Indian in the manner of the escape, Magua admitted the truth of what he had heard, with a readiness that afforded additional evidence how little he would prize such worthless captives.
I knowing it was impossible for them to escape, capitulated with the enemy, and, at a distance in their view, gave notice to my men of their situation, with orders not to resist, but surrender themselves captives.
The walls were thickly covered with pictures and portraits (in profile), some done with ink, some with soot, some with a pencil, and some with red, blue, and green chalks; and whenever an inch or two of space had remained between the pictures, the captives had written plaintive verses, or names and dates.
The hours wasted away, and hunger came to tor- ment the captives again.
Creakle entered after breakfast, and stood in the doorway looking round upon us like a giant in a story-book surveying his captives.
Her mother, Macropha, my wife, was of Swazi blood, and was brought to the king's kraal with other captives after a raid, and given to me as a wife by the king.
Yet, brother, take my advice, and file your tongue to a little more courtesy than your habits of predominating over infidel captives and Eastern bondsmen have accustomed you.
But at last the time came when the giant took it into his head to amuse himself by arranging fights between some of his captives.
Our condition here was not much better than that of the illustrious captives whom we left behind.
Men were running about gathering in the loose stock, and two or three were already leading their captives back to the end of the village where Meriem and Baynes were busy with the trappings of their mounts.
The drug had no discriminating action; it was neither diabolical nor divine; it but shook the doors of the prisonhouse of my disposition; and like the captives of Philippi, that which stood within ran forth.