caravaneer

caravaneer

(ˌkærəvænˈɪə)
n
the person leading a caravan of camels
References in periodicals archive ?
Yak butter placed on the brow and horn tips of each yak, and the head of every caravaneer, was intended to please the deities and protect against falls, rock slides and unseasonable blizzards.
Another autobiography by a Ladakhi caravaneer is Abdul Wahid Radhu's Caravane Tibetaine (Paris: Fayard, 1981).
If grain at your disposal is scarce, write me and I can load up 50,000 donkey (measures) and convey it by a caravaneer [Veenhof 1992, "at the earliest opportunity"] to Marl.
The caravaneer commercial bourgeoisie, which has always been composed of a certain percentage of Muslims, has grown less religiously homogenous, a potential source of friction which, so far, seems to have been contained in favour of a more desirable common interest: economic and political stability.
way stations appeared in the area to tend to the needs of the caravaneers and their animals plying trans-Himalayan trade routes.
Seven articles published by Abistan's e-news and the +1 is a mountaineer's tale, written on a sheet of paper circulated by caravaneers.
These were nomads and farmers, seafarers and caravaneers, slaves and freemen, merchants and mercenaries, colonists and zealots.
The Midianites are portrayed in these [biblical] traditions as nomadic sheep and camel herders, caravaneers, and raiders, ranging over a wide territory to the south and east of Canaan.
Having obtained some armed men from the rajah she takes hostage some caravaneers from Kec.