carbuncle

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car·bun·cle

 (kär′bŭng′kəl)
n.
1. A painful localized bacterial infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that usually has several openings through which pus is discharged.
2.
a. A red precious stone, especially a deep-red garnet cut as a cabochon.
b. A mythical gemstone said to emit light even in total darkness.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin carbunculus, small glowing ember, carbuncle, diminutive of carbō, carbōn-, coal; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

car′bun′cled adj.
car·bun′cu·lar (-kyə-lər) adj.

carbuncle

(ˈkɑːˌbʌŋkəl)
n
1. (Pathology) an extensive skin eruption, similar to but larger than a boil, with several openings: caused by staphylococcal infection
2. (Jewellery) a rounded gemstone, esp a garnet cut without facets
3. (Colours) a dark reddish-greyish-brown colour
[C13: from Latin carbunculus diminutive of carbō coal]
ˈcarˌbuncled adj
carbuncular adj

car•bun•cle

(ˈkɑr bʌŋ kəl)

n.
1. a local skin inflammation of deep interconnected boils.
2. a cabochon-cut garnet.
3. Obs. any rounded red gem.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin carbunculus kind of precious stone, tumor, literally, live coal =carbōn-, s. of carbō burning charcoal + -culus -cule1]
car′bun•cled, adj.
car•bun′cu•lar, adj.

Carbuncle

1. A large, deep boil.
2. A red gemstone, generally a ruby or a garnet. However, Sherlock Holmes once had a case involving a blue carbuncle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbuncle - deep-red cabochon garnet cut without facets
garnet - any of a group of hard glassy minerals (silicates of various metals) used as gemstones and as an abrasive
2.carbuncle - an infection larger than a boil and with several openings for discharge of pus
staphylococcal infection - an infection with staphylococcus bacteria; usually marked by abscess formation
Translations
carboucleescarboucle

carbuncle

[ˈkɑːbʌŋkl] N
1. (Med) → carbunc(l)o m
2. (= ruby) → carbúnculo m, carbunco m

carbuncle

n
(Med) → Karbunkel m
(= jewel)Karfunkel(stein) m

carbuncle

[ˈkɑːˌbʌŋkl] n (Med) → foruncolo

car·bun·cle

n. carbunco, furúnculo, infl. con pus,
pop. avispero.

carbuncle

n ántrax m, infección f de varios folículos pilosos cercanos
References in classic literature ?
He would often spend a whole day settling and resettling in their cases the various stones that be had collected, such as the olive-green chrysoberyl that turns red by lamplight, the cymophane with its wirelike line of silver, the pistachio-coloured peridot, rose-pink and wine-yellow topazes, carbuncles of fiery scarlet with tremulous, four-rayed stars, flame-red cinnamon-stones, orange and violet spinels, and amethysts with their alternate layers of ruby and sapphire.
Suddenly there is presented to his sight a strong castle or gorgeous palace with walls of massy gold, turrets of diamond and gates of jacinth; in short, so marvellous is its structure that though the materials of which it is built are nothing less than diamonds, carbuncles, rubies, pearls, gold, and emeralds, the workmanship is still more rare.
Here and there out of the darkness round me the Morlocks' eyes shone like carbuncles.
His little gray eyes shone like carbuncles, and appeared, with his grinning mouth, to be the only part of his face in which life survived.
But instead of either of these, he saw nothing but a strange face, sunburnt, and encircled by a beard, with eyes brilliant as carbuncles, and a smile upon the mouth which displayed a perfect set of white teeth, pointed and sharp as the wolf's or jackal's.
On it and in it and rising through it, as wrecks lift through the sand, were jewelled elephant-howdahs of embossed silver, studded with plates of hammered gold, and adorned with carbuncles and turquoises.
And at the bottom, quite in the shade, where the details are absorbed in the obscurity, the mastiff, with his eyes glistening like carbuncles, and shaking his chain, on which the double light from the lamp of Rosa and the lantern of Gryphus threw a brilliant glitter.
They gather also pearls by the seaside, and diamonds and carbuncles upon certain rocks.
There were forty carbuncles, two hundred and ten sapphires, sixty-one agates, and a great quantity of beryls, onyxes, cats'-eyes, turquoises, and other stones, the very names of which I did not know at the time, though I have become more familiar with them since.
Do you remember that time last summer I treated him for those carbuncles on his neck?
Holding a microscope to the first-mentioned red ant, I saw that, though he was assiduously gnawing at the near fore leg of his enemy, having severed his remaining feeler, his own breast was all torn away, exposing what vitals he had there to the jaws of the black warrior, whose breastplate was apparently too thick for him to pierce; and the dark carbuncles of the sufferer's eyes shone with ferocity such as war only could excite.
Crioni went at once to the palace, denounced the criminal, and handed over the carbuncle as evidence.