Caribou Inuit


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Caribou Inuit

n
(Peoples) a member of any of the Inuit peoples who formerly inhabited the Barren Lands of N Canada
References in periodicals archive ?
A striking photo of Caribou Inuit hunters at Nueltin Lake is included, a valuable addition to the important photographic record of the "people of the willows" left by the Anglican Clergyman, Donald B.
From west to east they include the Inuvialuit of the Mackenzie River Delta; the Copper Inuit of Coronation Gulf; the Netsilik Inuit of Boothia Peninsula and surrounding area; the Iglulik Inuit of Melville Peninsula and northern Baffin Island; the Caribou Inuit of the interior of the west coast of Hudson Bay; the Baffinland Inuit of south-central Baffin Island; the Nunavik Inuit, who occupy the south shore of Hudson Strait, the east coast of Hudson Bay and the interior of northern Quebec; and the Labrador Inuit (Figure 1).
Ship-based trade continued between the HBC supply ships and the Hudson Strait Inuit, as well as with Caribou Inuit living on the west side of Hudson Bay.
The Harvaqtuuq project, developed to record some of the places of cultural significance of the inland-dwelling Caribou Inuit (Stewart et al.
Key words: caribou crossings, Caribou Inuit, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Harvaqtuurmiut, Inuit oral history, Kazan River, off-site archaeology, place names, settlement archaeology, traditional knowledge
This research is relevant to the history of the Caribou Inuit and, more generally, to the definition and interpretation of archaeological evidence of northern hunter-gatherers.
The project was jointly designed by archaeologists, cultural geographers, local elders, and oral historians from Baker Lake to record some of the heritage of the inland-dwelling Caribou Inuit.
There is also historic evidence for visiting among Caribou Inuit societies during the 19th and 20th centuries, so that not all features and sites along the lower Kazan River can be assigned to the Harvaqtuurmiut (Harvaqtuurmiut Elders et al.
Second, most of these features can be recognized as pertaining to Caribou Inuit settlement rather than non-Inuit (Dene and earlier) land use.
Also, other Caribou Inuit groups used this area, and Harvaqtuurmiut families certainly moved beyond the boundaries of the study area, so that this part of the lower Kazan River represents only a part of any one family's total range:
Protohistoric settlement patterns in the interior District of Keewatin: Implications for Caribou Inuit social organization.