dental caries

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Related to Carious lesion: incipient decay

dental caries

n.
1. The formation of cavities in the teeth by the action of bacteria; tooth decay.
2. (used with a pl. verb) Cavities in the teeth formed by such action.

den′tal car′ies


n.
decay in teeth caused by bacteria that form acids in the presence of sucrose, other sugars, and refined starches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dental caries - soft decayed area in a toothdental caries - soft decayed area in a tooth; progressive decay can lead to the death of a tooth
decay - the process of gradually becoming inferior
Translations
zubní kaz
fogszú
References in periodicals archive ?
Missing 'just my cleaning' may not seem like a big deal; but would a patient feel differently if they knew they were also missing an important cancer screening or reevaluation of an early carious lesion that has been treated nonsurgically?
They also observed that the greater the period of exposure of the first permanent molar's sound mesial surface to the carious lesion of the second primary molar, the greater is the risk of developing caries on the sound surface.
During the progression of an enamel carious lesion, active demineralization occurs mainly at the "advancing front" of the lesion (Fig.
Similarities in the attrition rates and carious lesion rates were found between the populations on Crete more so than with populations from mainland Greece suggesting that the diets in Crete have been relatively steady over time and have differed from the populations of mainland of Greece in the Middle Bronze Age, Mycenaean, and Sub Mycenaean periods.
A complete adult dentition is present, with no ante-mortem tooth loss or other evidence of dental disease, with the exception of the lower left second molar, which shows a carious lesion on its occlusal surface.
In its first stages, a carious lesion does not contain an actual "cavity"; the tooth mineral just becomes more porous and "spongy" as swiss-cheese-like holes begin to form within it.
Secondary prevention is employed after the patient has developed a carious lesion but before it has cavitated.
The risk of developing new caries in the presence of an existing carious lesion appeared to increase with increasing deft and DMFT.
Unlike radiographs in which the "incident beam is transmitted through the entire tooth" resulting in an image which can show the extent of carious lesion penetration into a tooth, DIFOTI images only the light emerging from the surface of the tooth closest to the CCD camera.
The nick may not be noticeable to the human eye, but over time, bacteria will easily stick to that area and may become the start of a carious lesion.
When the affected tooth erupts, it is assumed that microorganisms may ingress through microscopic external enamel openings into the resorbed cavity to cause further breakdown, so that a large carious lesion results [McNamara et al.
One recent guideline published within the author's country has suggested that where a narrow band of "normal" dentine can be seen on a dental radiograph between a carious lesion and the dental pulp and where the tooth is both clinically- and radiographically-free of signs of pulpal disease, then to manage the tooth without recourse to pulp treatment [NHS, Scotland, 2010].