libido

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li·bi·do

 (lĭ-bē′dō, -bī′-)
n. pl. li·bi·dos
1. The psychic and emotional energy associated with instinctual biological drives.
2.
a. Sexual desire.
b. Manifestation of the sexual drive.

[Latin libīdō, desire; see leubh- in Indo-European roots.]

li·bid′i·nal (-bĭd′n-əl) adj.
li·bid′i·nal·ly adv.

libido

(lɪˈbiːdəʊ)
n, pl -dos
1. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal psychic energy emanating from the id
2. sexual urge or desire
[C20 (in psychoanalysis): from Latin: desire]
libidinal adj
liˈbidinally adv

li•bi•do

(lɪˈbi doʊ)

n., pl. -dos.
1. Psychoanal. all of the instinctual energies and desires that are derived from the id.
2. sexual instinct or drive.
[1890–95; < Latin libīdō desire, lust, akin to libēre to be pleasing]
li•bid′i•nal (-ˈbɪd n l) adj.
li•bid′i•nal•ly, adv.

libido

Psychoanalysis. the force or psychic energy behind human action, especially the sexual urge. — libidinous, adj.
See also: Sex

libido

The sex instinct or erotic desire.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.libido - (psychoanalysis) a Freudian term for sexual urge or desire
depth psychology, psychoanalysis, analysis - a set of techniques for exploring underlying motives and a method of treating various mental disorders; based on the theories of Sigmund Freud; "his physician recommended psychoanalysis"
concupiscence, physical attraction, sexual desire, eros - a desire for sexual intimacy

libido

noun sex drive, passion, sexual desire, sexual appetite, sexual urge, erotic desire, sex instinct, the hots (informal), randiness (informal, chiefly Brit.) Lack of sleep is a major factor in loss of libido.
Translations
libido

libido

[lɪˈbiːdəʊ] Nlibido f

libido

[lɪˈbiːdəʊ] nlibido f

libido

nLibido f

libido

[lɪˈbiːdəʊ] n (Psych) → libido f inv

li·bi·do

n. libido. 1. impulso sexual, consciente o inconsciente; 2. en psicoanálisis, la fuerza o energía que determina la conducta del ser humano.

libido

n libido f, deseo sexual
References in classic literature ?
The minister almost wept with joy at this deliver- ance from the carnal desire to "peep" and went back to his own house praising God.
be exposed to peculiar temptations, on account of the carnal desires which have heretofore subsisted between them.
Secondly, the second brother that ran away on account of being told of the past was not really led by God, but by his carnal desire.
The observance of Ramadan is not all about abstaining from food and carnal desire during the day and lavish Iftar.
Like the characters themselves, we grow accustomed to behaviors that may at first elicit revulsion and come to apprehend intimacy and carnal desire, in all its variations, with more willingness and insight.
Indeed, the reader will learn of Churchill's carnal desire to kill during battles in the Mohmand Valley, located in what is today the highly contentious border between Afghanistan and Pakistan.
To complicate this prevailing dichotomy, the present essay examines Cantwell and Renata's language as it alternates between the registers of courtly romance and carnal desire.
There is a light touch of Raymond Chandler to this writing, evidenced when he describes a Romanian princess as being "so perfect as to be almost beyond carnal desire," or quipping as he does later that she is "one of those women you can't take your eyes off of for fear you'll miss something.
AdRants writer Steve Hall said: "All the brand has done, and always has done, is celebrate the carnal desire that is ever present between man and woman.
2), who is interpreted as the captivating female figure who encapsulates carnal desire.
He praises Diotema's theory of love for its step-by-step "elevation" of carnal desire to a so-called spiritual love for "the actual form or idea of beauty itself.
is built on carnal desire (possibly, with modern 'extensions' to Europe and North America?