carnitine

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Related to Carnatine: Carnitine deficiency, acetyl l-carnitine

car·ni·tine

 (kär′nĭ-tēn′)
n.
A compound that functions in fatty acid metabolism by transporting fatty acids into mitochondria for energy production. It is naturally produced in the body and is present in many animal products, especially red meat. It is also sold as a dietary supplement for its purported health benefits.

[German Karnitin, from Karnin, a basic substance derived from meat, from Latin carō, carn-, flesh; see carnal.]

carnitine

(ˈkɑːnɪˌtaɪn)
n
a white betaine, C7H15NO3, found in the liver and required for transporting fatty acids from the cytosol into the mitochondria
Translations

carnitine

n carnitina
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Both metabolic (Somatotropin [beta]-Agonists estrogenic and androgenic implants; conjugated linoleic acid; chromium, carnatine, magnesium, niacin, manganese, selenium betaine, vitamin A, D, and E) and fermentation modifiers (methane inhibitors, proteolysis and deamination inhibitors, defaunation agents, microbial enzymes, buffer agents, ionophores, probiotics, yeast cultures, mold fermentation extracts and non-ionic surfactant) have been extensively used in dairy and beef cattle to improve the feed utilization and productive response.
Because both carnatine and leupeptin are known compounds to the FDA, and because much larger doses of leupeptin alone have been studied in humans, Xechem believes this is not a high risk development program.
The beverage is packed with vitamins, minerals, and botanicals such as Ginseng, Guarana, Gingko Biloba, and Carnatine to supply long lasting energy.