carnation

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car·na·tion

 (kär-nā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Any of numerous cultivated forms of a perennial plant (Dianthus caryophyllus) having showy, variously colored, usually double, often fragrant flowers with fringed petals.
b. A flower of this plant. Also called clove pink.
2. A pinkish tint once used in painting.

[From obsolete French, flesh-colored, from Old French (from Old Italian carnagione, skin, complexion, from carne, flesh) or from Late Latin carnātiō, carnātiōn-, flesh, both from Latin carō, carn-; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

carnation

(kɑːˈneɪʃən)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: clove pink a Eurasian caryophyllaceous plant, Dianthus caryophyllus, cultivated in many varieties for its white, pink, or red flowers, which have a fragrant scent of cloves
2. (Plants) the flower of this plant
3. (Colours)
a. a pink or reddish-pink colour
b. (as adjective): a carnation dress.
4. (Art Terms) (often plural) a flesh tint in painting
[C16: from French: flesh colour, from Late Latin carnātiō fleshiness, from Latin carō flesh]

car•na•tion

(kɑrˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
1. any of numerous cultivated varieties of the clove pink, Dianthus caryophyllus, having long-stalked fragrant usu. double flowers in many colors.
2. pink; light red.
3. Obs. the color of flesh.
[1525–35; < Late Latin carnātiō corpulence < Latin carn- flesh]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carnation - Eurasian plant with pink to purple-red spice-scented usually double flowerscarnation - Eurasian plant with pink to purple-red spice-scented usually double flowers; widely cultivated in many varieties and many colors
garden pink, pink - any of various flowers of plants of the genus Dianthus cultivated for their fragrant flowers
2.carnation - a pink or reddish-pink color
pink - a light shade of red
Adj.1.carnation - pink or pinkish
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Translations
karafiát
nellike
neilikka
karanfil
カーネーション
카네이션
nejlika
ดอกคาร์เนชั่น
cây cẩm chướng

carnation

[kɑːˈneɪʃən] Nclavel m

carnation

[kɑːrˈneɪʃən] nœillet m

carnation

nNelke f

carnation

[kɑːˈneɪʃn] ngarofano

carnation

قَرَنْفُل karafiát nellike Nelke γαρύφαλλο clavel neilikka œillet karanfil garofano カーネーション 카네이션 anjer nellik goździk cravo гвоздика nejlika ดอกคาร์เนชั่น karanfil cây cẩm chướng 康乃馨
References in classic literature ?
The carnations of the painting had withered, but the eyes were still wonderful in their depth and brilliancy of colour.
The roof was all of crimson roses, the windows of lilies, the walls of white carnations, the floors of glowing auriculas and violets, the doors of gorgeous tulips and narcissi with sunflowers for knockers, and all round hyacinths and other sweet-smelling flowers bloomed in masses, so that the air was perfumed far and near and enchanted all who were present.
Their door would have to yield to the pressure when a mountain of carnations should be piled up against it.
Beaufort's having sent her wonderful orchids, and cousin Henry van der Luyden a whole hamper of carnations from Skuytercliff.
They wandered in and out of glass-houses, saw lilies swimming in tanks, breathed in the scent of thousands of carnations, and compared their respective tastes in the matter of trees and lakes.
Here you see tin camelias, tin marigolds, tin carnations, tin poppies and tin hollyhocks growing as naturally as if they were real.
who, being expelled from Lisbon, had retired to the island of Terceira, where he amused himself, not, like the great Conde, with watering his carnations, but with growing tulips -- had, on seeing the Boxtel tulip, exclaimed, "Not so bad, by any means
When Prissy Andrews, attired in a new pink-silk waist with a string of pearls about her smooth white throat and real carnations in her hair--rumor whispered that the master had sent all the way to town for them for her--"climbed the slimy ladder, dark without one ray of light," Anne shivered in luxurious sympathy; when the choir sang "Far Above the Gentle Daisies" Anne gazed at the ceiling as if it were frescoed with angels; when Sam Sloane proceeded to explain and illustrate "How Sockery Set a Hen" Anne laughed until people sitting near her laughed too, more out of sympathy with her than with amusement at a selection that was rather threadbare even in Avonlea; and when Mr.
She told many a good story about Miss Crawley's illness in after days--stories which made the lady blush through her artificial carnations.
But roses only bloom in summer; whereas the fine carnation of their cheeks is perennial as sunlight in the seventh heavens.
In Bowre and Field he sought, where any tuft Of Grove or Garden-Plot more pleasant lay, Thir tendance or Plantation for delight, By Fountain or by shadie Rivulet He sought them both, but wish'd his hap might find EVE separate, he wish'd, but not with hope Of what so seldom chanc'd, when to his wish, Beyond his hope, EVE separate he spies, Veild in a Cloud of Fragrance, where she stood, Half spi'd, so thick the Roses bushing round About her glowd, oft stooping to support Each Flour of slender stalk, whose head though gay Carnation, Purple, Azure, or spect with Gold, Hung drooping unsustaind, them she upstaies Gently with Mirtle band, mindless the while, Her self, though fairest unsupported Flour, From her best prop so farr, and storn so nigh.
Her glance quailed not, her cheek blanched not, for the fear of a fate so instant and so horrible; on the contrary, the thought that she had her fate at her command, and could escape at will from infamy to death, gave a yet deeper colour of carnation to her complexion, and a yet more brilliant fire to her eye.