carotene

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Related to Carotenes: chlorophyll b, Xanthophylls, Anthocyanins, Phycobilins

car·o·tene

 (kăr′ə-tēn′) also car·o·tin (-tĭn)
n.
An orange-yellow to red crystalline pigment, C40H56, found in animal tissue and certain plants, such as carrots and squash. It exists in several isomeric forms and is converted to vitamin A in the liver.

[German Karotin, from Latin carōta, carrot; see carrot.]

carotene

(ˈkærəˌtiːn) or

carotin

n
(Biochemistry) any of four orange-red isomers of an unsaturated hydrocarbon present in many plants (β-carotene is the orange pigment of carrots) and converted to vitamin A in the liver. Formula: C40H56
[C19 carotin, from Latin carōta carrot; see -ene]

car•o•tene

(ˈkær əˌtin)

also car•o•tin

(-tɪn)

n.
any of three yellow or orange fat-soluble pigments having the formula C40H56, found in many plants, esp. carrots, and transformed into vitamin A in the liver; provitamin A.
[1860–65; < Late Latin carōt(a) carrot + -ene]

car·o·tene

(kăr′ə-tēn′)
An organic compound that occurs as an orange-yellow to red pigment in many plants and in animal tissue. In animals, it is converted to vitamin A by the liver. Carotenes give plants such as carrots, pumpkins, and dandelions their characteristic color.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carotene - an orange isomer of an unsaturated hydrocarbon found in many plants; is converted into vitamin A in the liver
beta-carotene - an isomer of carotene that is found in dark green and dark yellow fruits and vegetables
provitamin - vitamin precursor; a substance that is converted into a vitamin in animal tissues
2.carotene - yellow or orange-red fat-soluble pigments in plants
carotenoid - any of a class of highly unsaturated yellow to red pigments occurring in plants and animals
Translations
karoteen

carotene

[ˈkærətiːn] Ncaroteno m

carotene

nKarotin nt

car·o·tene

n. caroteno, pigmento amarillo rojizo presente en vegetales que se convierte en vitamina A en el cuerpo.

carotene

n caroteno
References in periodicals archive ?
This forecast and market trend report on Beta-Carotenes covers an in-depth analysis of Beta- Carotenes ingredients manufacturers and ingredients products characteristics in relation to raw material use and extraction methods.
Responding to the consumer's need for more transparency in the labelling of their food and beverages, Kalsec[R] offers carotenes from carrot extract as a natural colour source.
These significantly positive results suggest treating patients at high risk for cancer with a mixture of natural tomato extract, carotenes and vitamin E holds promise as a viable clinical application.
What's more, new evidence supports the value of carotenes as antioxidants that may reduce our risk of cancer, stroke, arteriosclerosis and cataracts.
What's more, new evidence further supports the value of carotenes as antioxidants that may reduce our risk of cancer, stroke, arteriosclerosis, and cataracts.
And another strain of carrots Simon has worked on contains as much as 500 ppm alpha and beta carotenes.
Simultaneous determination of retinol, tocopherols, carotenes and lycopene in plasma by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on reversed phase.
Only seven of the men had frequently eaten foods that are especially rich in beta-carotene (like spinach and other leafy greens) and had infrequently eaten foods that are rich in both carotenes (like carrots and sweet potatoes).
This product includes CoQ10, L-Carnitine, Hawthorne Berry extract, Garlic, carotenes, essential fatty acids, and in some formula versions Pregnenolone, DHEA, amino acid complex, B vitamins and more.
49 among subjects with low serum carotenes, while the corresponding odds ratio among subjects with higher levels of serum carotenes was 1.