Carpatho-Ukraine


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Carpatho-Ukraine

(kɑːˈpeɪθəʊjuːˈkreɪn)
n
(Placename) another name for Ruthenia
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References in periodicals archive ?
1938-March 1939) and "how fears that Hitler was about to create a 'Greater Ukraine' internationalized the issue of Carpatho-Ukraine, which some feared would be the first step in Germany's destabilization of the Soviet Union.
8) 1938 was the year of the First Vienna Award, by which the Germans and Italians restored to Hungary the southern strips of Slovakia and Carpatho-Ukraine (Ruthenia).
11) It was possible for the first time since World War II to get theologians from Estonia and the Carpatho-Ukraine for a collegial meeting.
The Ukrainian immigrants who came from the provinces of Galicia and Carpatho-Ukraine were Eastern rite (Greek) Catholics, while those who originated in the Bukovina area of the Carpathian Mountains, and from Eastern Ukraine, were Eastern rite Greek Orthodox.
Bohemia and Moravia became a German protectorate, Slovakia passed under German control, and Carpatho-Ukraine was annexed by Hungary.
It describes how Western opinion, including Canadian, reacted to the new state, and how fears that Hitler was about to create a "Greater Ukraine" internationalized the issue of Carpatho-Ukraine, which some feared would be the first step in Germany's destabilization of the Soviet Union.
The Munich agreement of September 29, 1938 significantly weakened Czechoslovakia, which on November 7 recognized the desire of Slovakia for autonomy and, on the following day, that of Carpatho-Ukraine, which formed a government on November 11.
It was reported that 100,000 German troops were ready to fight to prevent Poland and Hungary from crushing Carpatho-Ukraine (Toronto Daily Star, 29 Nov.
Four years later, in 1938, MPs who worked with the Bureau asked the government to comment on the campaign against Ukrainian schools in Romania, the dissolution of the Ukrainian Women's Union, the confiscation and destruction of Orthodox Church property in Poland, and the status of post-Munich Carpatho-Ukraine (LD 14, 23, 29 November, 1 December 1938).
OUN activity in Carpatho-Ukraine (Carpatho-Ruthenia), which was granted autonomy after the Munich accord, created an ever-widening chasm between the Ukrainian Bureau and the radical Nationalists.
When the inevitable happened and Carpatho-Ukraine was annexed by Hungary with Hitler's blessings on the same day that the Germans marched into Prague, Makohin cursed and disavowed the OUN (LAC, MG31 D69, vol.