carronade


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Related to carronade: cannonade

carronade

(ˌkærəˈneɪd)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) an obsolete naval gun of short barrel and large bore
[C18: named after Carron, Scotland, where it was first cast; see -ade]
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References in classic literature ?
Bennet was rather a man of science than a man of war, which did not, however, prevent his vessel from carrying four carronades, that had never hurt any body, to be sure, but had performed the most pacific duty in the world.
The rating system itself was a legacy system that did not take into account developments such as the introduction of the short-range carronade.
Carronade cannons were used by the Duke of Wellington when he defeated Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.
The carronade, another type of gun Constitution used during its history, weighed more than 2,000 pounds without the carriage and needed a crew of 4 to 8 men.
James was a member of the Ordnance Society and also enjoyed firing some of the smaller ordnance such as a carronade - such as to celebrate his son's wedding.
The carronade was used in the Battle of Trafalgar and American Civil War.
In order to disperse the Aborigines, said Moore, he ordered a carronade to be fired, whereupon the Aborigines retreated up a valley, leaving a two-year-old boy behind.
With their surfeit of short-range carronade or "smashers", the British had an advantage in rough weather, darkness or mist, allowing them to get in close.
A mystery surrounds two brass guns located by HMAS Encounter on an island in Napier Broome Bay WA in 1916, now called Carronade Island.
At about 1100, Perry stepped forward and climbed upon a carronade carriage midship on the Lawrence's larboard side.
Never mind their firing; when I fire a carronade (a small cannon) from the quarter-deck, that will be the signal for you to begin, and I know you will do your duty as Englishmen.