carronade

(redirected from Carronades)

carronade

(ˌkærəˈneɪd)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) an obsolete naval gun of short barrel and large bore
[C18: named after Carron, Scotland, where it was first cast; see -ade]
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References in classic literature ?
Bennet was rather a man of science than a man of war, which did not, however, prevent his vessel from carrying four carronades, that had never hurt any body, to be sure, but had performed the most pacific duty in the world.
In comparison with a sixty-four-gun ship such as Africa, President and United States displaced approximately 150 tons more, had a similar complement, and threw a broadside that was one hundred pounds heavier, albeit with a larger percentage of short-range carronades.
The main chemical constituents of tea include amino acids chlorophylls and carronades, lipids, certain volatile compounds, enzymes and minerals.
The Industrial Revolution, which supplied the standardsized pulleys on the great war machines of Nelson's battle fleet and the carronades bored out of solid castings on steam-operated jigs that were mounted on the smaller warships of his day, followed on, rather than created, the culture of bodies of men working in unison as part of a mechanical operation.
That year, Congress set aside a $10,000 appropriation for "surfboats, rockets, carronades and other necessary apparatus for the better preservation of life and property from shipwrecks on the coast of New Jersey lying between Sandy Hook and Little Egg Harbor.
Well, it's routinely accepted that in the age of fighting sail, ships only pounded one another to pieces firing broadsides with their cannon and carronades at a distance until one vessel surrendered or was sunk.
British Royal Marines under Nelson fought from the decks with the +77-caliber Brown Bess smoothbore Sea Service muskets, carronades and grenades.
The enemy being to windward had the advantage of engaging us at his own distance, which was so great, that for the first half hour we did not use our carronades, & at no moment was he within the complete effect of our musketry or grape--to this circumstance & a heavy swell which was on at the time I ascribe the unusual length of the action.
But at this time a great party was in Camp, and on a proposal from Mr Mountgarrett to fire one of the Carronades to intimidate them they dispersed.
Not only was slavery in Tripoli a nightmare of torture and endless labor (there's a reason why Barbary and barbarous sound so much alike), but the Philadelphia, which boasted 28 18-pound guns and 16 carronades capable of shooting 32-pound cannonballs, was now in the hands of the Bashaw (or Pasha, ruler) of Tripoli.
By cutting the line of enemy ships - a risky manoeuvre as he had to take several broadsides to do it - Nelson was able to bring his carronades (close-quarter cannon) into action, which had a devastating effect and helped swing the battle in Britain's favour.