Carthage

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Related to Carthaginian Empire: Byzantine Empire, Roman Empire, Punic Wars

Car·thage

 (kär′thĭj)
An ancient city and state of northern Africa on the Bay of Tunis northeast of modern Tunis. It was founded by the Phoenicians in the ninth century bc and became the center of a maritime empire in the Mediterranean after the sixth century bc. The city was destroyed by the Romans at the end of the Third Punic War (146 bc) but was rebuilt by Julius Caesar and later (ad 439-533) served as capital of the Vandals before its virtual annihilation by the Arabs (698).

Car′tha·gin′i·an (kär′thə-jĭn′ē-ən) adj. & n.

Carthage

(ˈkɑːθɪdʒ)
n
(Placename) an ancient city state, on the N African coast near present-day Tunis. Founded about 800 bc by Phoenician traders, it grew into an empire dominating N Africa and the Mediterranean. Destroyed and then rebuilt by Rome, it was finally razed by the Arabs in 697 ad. See also Punic Wars

Car•thage

(ˈkɑr θɪdʒ)

n.
an ancient city-state in N Africa near modern Tunis: founded by the Phoenicians in the 9th cent. B.C.; destroyed 146 B.C. in the last Punic War.
Car•tha•gin•i•an (ˌkɑr θəˈdʒɪn i ən) n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Carthage - an ancient city state on the north African coast near modern Tunis; founded by Phoenicians; destroyed and rebuilt by Romans; razed by Arabs in 697
Phenicia, Phoenicia - an ancient maritime country (a collection of city states) at eastern end of the Mediterranean
Carthaginian - a native or inhabitant of ancient Carthage
Translations
قرطاج
Картаген
Cartago
Kartágo
Karthago
Kartago
Kartaago
Karthago
קרתגו
Kartaga
Karthágó
Kartago
Karþagó
カルタゴ
Karthago
Kartagina
Kartāga
Karthago
Kartagina
Cartago
Cartagina
Kartágo
Kartagina
Картагина
Karthago
Karthago
Kartaca
Карфаген

Carthage

[ˈkɑːθɪdʒ] NCartago f

Carthage

nKarthago nt

Carthage

[ˈkɑːθɪdʒ] nCartagine f
References in periodicals archive ?
Africa derives its name from the great Carthaginian empire with its roots in modern-day Tunisia.
Objective: Between 237 and 202 BC, the Carthaginian Empire due to both its territorial ambitions and, above all, its conflicts with Rome and several indigenous peoples of the Iberian Peninsula and North Africa, was forced to keep large numbers of troops permanently mobilized.
A visit to the northern coast would not be complete without going to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Carthage, located on the eastern side of Lake Tunis, the ruins of a city that once lay at the heart of the Carthaginian Empire.