Carthusian


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Car·thu·sian

 (kär-tho͞o′zhən)
n.
A member of a contemplative Roman Catholic order founded during the 11th century by Saint Bruno.
adj.
Of or relating to the Carthusian order.

[Medieval Latin Carthusiānus, from Cartusius.]

Carthusian

(kɑːˈθjuːzɪən)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church
a. a member of an austere monastic order founded by Saint Bruno in 1084 near Grenoble, France
b. (as modifier): a Carthusian monastery.
[C14: from Medieval Latin Carthusianus, from Latin Carthusia Chartreuse, near Grenoble]

Car•thu•sian

(kɑrˈθu ʒən)
n.
1. a member of a monastic order founded by St. Bruno in 1086 near Grenoble, France.
adj.
2. pertaining to the Carthusians.
[1520–30; < Medieval Latin Cartusiānus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Carthusian - a member of the Carthusian orderCarthusian - a member of the Carthusian order  
Carthusian order - an austere contemplative Roman Catholic order founded by St. Bruno in 1084
monastic, monk - a male religious living in a cloister and devoting himself to contemplation and prayer and work
Adj.1.Carthusian - of or relating to the Carthusian order
Translations

Carthusian

[kɑːˈθjuːzɪən]
A. ADJcartujo
B. Ncartujo/a m/f
References in classic literature ?
So he said to him, "It seems to me, Senor Knight-errant, that your worship has made choice of one of the most austere professions in the world, and I imagine even that of the Carthusian monks is not so austere.
Behind these palaces, extended in all directions, now broken, fenced in, battlemented like a citadel, now veiled by great trees like a Carthusian convent, the immense and multiform enclosure of that miraculous Hôtel de Saint-Pol, where the King of France possessed the means of lodging superbly two and twenty princes of the rank of the dauphin and the Duke of Burgundy, with their domestics and their suites, without counting the great lords, and the emperor when he came to view Paris, and the lions, who had their separate Hôtel at the royal Hôtel.
The fuge, late, tace of the Carthusian brother is my motto here, my death to the world is the life of this canton, my prayer takes the form of the active work to which I have set my hand, and which I love--the work of sowing the seeds of happiness and joy, of giving to others what I myself have not.
The Carthusians were in the chapel, I went thither to join in their prayers, and there my resolutions vanished.
The building, which lies just yards off the main London Road, was originally part of the Carthusian Priory of St Anne, founded in 1381.
She chooses the Gloss, Denis the Carthusian, Nicholas of Lyra, and Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples.
This French artist gained the confidence of a community of sisters living on the outskirts of Paris; and the film is the most wonderful antidote to the Carthusian encomium Into great silence (dir.
In 1746 Abbe Jean-Antoine Nollet had 700 Carthusian monks stand in a circle in a field and wired them together.
THERE is a film, called Into Great Silence, which follows the life of Carthusian monks living in the French Alps.
Meeting ("AGM") will be held at 1 Carthusian Street, London, EC1M 6DZ, on 31st
Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt's an Old Carthusian, a product of pounds 29,430 Charterhouse in Surrey.
Melion ties this interpretive tradition not only to the well-established influence of Carthusian Ludolph of Saxony's Vita Christi, but also to the mystical theology of the Meditationes Sancti Bonaventurae by that Franciscan doctor.