map projection

(redirected from Cartographic projection)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

map projection

n
(Surveying) a means of representing or a representation of the globe or celestial sphere or part of it on a flat map, using a grid of lines of latitude and longitude

map projection

A device for showing the Earth’s curved surface on a flat sheet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.map projection - a projection of the globe onto a flat map using a grid of lines of latitude and longitudemap projection - a projection of the globe onto a flat map using a grid of lines of latitude and longitude
conformal projection, orthomorphic projection - a map projection in which a small area is rendered in its true shape
conic projection, conical projection - a map projection of the globe onto a cone with its point over one of the earth's poles
equal-area map projection, equal-area projection - a map projection in which quadrilaterals formed by meridians and parallels have an area on the map proportional to their area on the globe
Mercator projection, Mercator's projection - a map projection of the earth onto a cylinder; areas appear greater the farther they are from the equator
projection - the representation of a figure or solid on a plane as it would look from a particular direction
References in periodicals archive ?
It is noteworthy that da Vinci's world map has a unique cartographic projection onto 8 spherical-geometry triangles that provide close to isometric projection throughout the globe.
Behind a facade of mete technical specification, the legend confirms that the reinterpretation of the landscape is based on the cartographic projection of Delisle and French reports by missionaries like father Louis Hennepin, and the accounts of the Sieur de la Salle, Louis Joliet, and the Baron of Lahontan (three early French mappers of the Mississippi), among others.
Then, the GIS created to support the project is described and the maps are detailed, indicating their purpose, the cartographic technique applied in designing them, the number of maps elaborated, the visualization mean, the scale, the reference system and the cartographic projection.
Here, the most disempowered individuals of local rural society, the 'lame and blind', desperately recast the trigonometrical points of Everest's cartographic projection as magical pilgrimage sites: rhizome-like networks of re/de-territorialization, (21) which work their way into the cartographic text.