caryatid

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car·y·at·id

 (kăr′ē-ăt′ĭd)
n. pl. car·y·at·ids or car·y·at·i·des (-ĭ-dēz′) Architecture
A supporting column sculptured in the form of a draped female figure.

[From Latin Caryātides, caryatids, from Greek Karuātides, priestesses of Artemis at Caryae, caryatids, from Karuai, Caryae, a village of Laconia in southern Greece with a famous temple to Artemis.]

car′y·at′i·dal (-ĭ-dəl), car′y·at′i·de′an (-ĭ-dē′ən), car′y·a·tid′ic (-ə-tĭd′ĭk) adj.

caryatid

(ˌkærɪˈætɪd)
n, pl -ids or -ides (-ɪˌdiːz)
(Architecture) a column, used to support an entablature, in the form of a draped female figure. Compare telamon
[C16: from Latin Caryātides, from Greek Karuatides priestesses of Artemis at Karuai (Caryae), village in Laconia]
ˌcaryˈatidal, ˌcaryˌatiˈdean, ˌcaryˈatic, caryatidic adj

car•y•at•id

(ˌkær iˈæt ɪd)

n., pl. -ids, -i•des (-ɪˌdiz)
a sculptured female figure used as a column. Compare atlas (def. 4).
[1555–65; < Latin Caryātides]
car`y•at′i•dal, adj.

caryatid

A female statue used as a column, as in an ancient Greek temple.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caryatid - a supporting column carved in the shape of a personcaryatid - a supporting column carved in the shape of a person
pillar, column - (architecture) a tall vertical cylindrical structure standing upright and used to support a structure
Translations

caryatid

[ˌkærɪˈætɪd] N (caryatids or caryatides (pl)) [ˌkærɪˈætɪdiːz]cariátide f

caryatid

nKaryatide f
References in classic literature ?
Let me begin with the corner room at the western extremity of the palace, called the Room of the Caryatides, from the statues which support the mantel-piece.
Here, scrambling over the heads of the crowd, he managed to get to the wall; when, seizing a flambeau from one of the Caryatides, he returned, as he went, to the centre of the room-leaping, with the agility of a monkey, upon the kings head, and thence clambered a few feet up the chain; holding down the torch to examine the group of ourang-outangs, and still screaming: "I shall soon find out who they are
Vaux-le-Vicomte, when its magnificent gates, supported by caryatides, have been passed through, has the principal front of the main building opening upon a vast, so-called, court of honor, inclosed by deep ditches, bordered by a magnificent stone balustrade.
I hardly ever failed, when I rambled through the village, to see a row of such worthies, either sitting on a ladder sunning themselves, with their bodies inclined forward and their eyes glancing along the line this way and that, from time to time, with a voluptuous expression, or else leaning against a barn with their hands in their pockets, like caryatides, as if to prop it up.