Casimir effect


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Related to Casimir effect: Zero point energy

Cas·i·mir effect

 (kăz′ə-mîr′)
n.
The effect of a net attractive force between objects in a vacuum, caused by the reduction of vacuum pressure in the space between the objects, where the wavelengths of vacuum fluctuations are more limited than in the space around the objects.

[After Hendrik Casimir (1909-2000), Dutch physicist who predicted its existence in collaboration with Dirk Polder (1919-2001), Dutch physicist.]
References in periodicals archive ?
This is an analogy to the well-known Casimir effect in quantum physics [4] which involves the suppression of the zero point field between two parallel conducting plates which are then forced together.
Yes, zero-point energy is real, as the Casimir effect and the Lamb shift bear out; but basic thermodynamics precludes extracting arbitrarily large "free energy" from the vacuum.
The phenomenon, known as the dynamical Casimir effect, has now been observed for the first time in a brilliant experiment conducted by the Chalmers scientists.
The 68 papers in the proceedings cover calculating and measuring Casimir forces, thermal Casimir effects, Casimir forces for real materials, Casimir-Polder forces, the dynamical Casimir effect, critical Casimir forces, gravitational effects, heat kernels and spectral determinants,energy densities, solitons and nanotubes, the Schwinger effect and quantum electrodynamics, and field theory in backgrounds.
Casimir effect is an effect in which two metallic plates that are located in quantum vacuum attract each other.
The acting bug never left the 6ft2ins silversmith so when he was contacted by director Gabriel Strange about appearing in his 45-minute film the Casimir Effect - a love story set against a background of time travel - he was happy to discuss the idea.
So when he was contacted by director Gabriel Strange about appearing in his 45 minute film the Casimir Effect - a love story set against a background of time travel - he was happy to discuss the idea.
Beyond the technique's future possibilities, the experiment also indicates that the Casimir effect may become problematic for designers of tiny machines, says Paul J.
McCulloch (2007) has proposed a new model for inertial mass that assumes that the inertia of an object is due to the Unruh radiation it sees when it accelerates, radiation which is also subject to a Hubble-scale Casimir effect.
The force is an example of the Casimir effect, generated by all-pervasive quantum fluctuations.