Catch-22


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Related to Catch-22: Joseph Heller

Catch-22

also catch-22 (kăch′twĕn-tē-to͞o′, kĕch′-)
n.
1. A situation in which a desired outcome or solution is impossible to attain because of a set of inherently contradictory rules or conditions: "In the Catch-22 of a closed repertoire, only music that is already familiar is thought to deserve familiarity" (Joseph McLennan).
2. A contradictory or self-defeating course of action: "The Catch-22 of his administration was that every grandiose improvement scheme began with community dismemberment" (Village Voice).
3. A tricky or disadvantageous condition; a catch: "Of course, there is a Catch-22 with Form 4868—you are supposed to include a check if you owe any additional tax, otherwise you face some penalties" (New York).

[After Catch-22, a novel by Joseph Heller.]

Catch′-22′ adj.

catch-22

n
1. a situation in which a person is frustrated by a paradoxical rule or set of circumstances that preclude any attempt to escape from them
2. a situation in which any move that a person can make will lead to trouble
[C20: from the title of a novel (1961) by the US writer J. Heller (1923–99)]

Catch-22

(ˈkætʃˌtwɛn tiˈtu)

n., pl. Catch-22's, Catch-22s.
1. a frustrating situation in which one is trapped by contradictory regulations or conditions.
2. any illogical or paradoxical problem or situation; dilemma.
3. a condition, regulation, etc., preventing the resolution of a problem or situation; catch.
[from a military regulation in a novel of the same name (1961) by U.S. novelist Joseph Heller]
Translations

catch-22

[ˌkætʃˌtwentɪˈtuː] N a catch-22 situationun callejón sin salida, un círculo vicioso

catch-22

[ˈkætʃˌtwɛntɪˈtuː] n it's a catch-22 situationnon c'è via d'uscita
References in periodicals archive ?
I began this article by putting forward the hypothesis that a higher frequency of negative words in Catch-22 could be interpreted as an indication that negation is a salient stylistic feature in Heller's novel, an argument which would be supported by qualitative analysis.
Wikipedia describes Catch-22 as a paradoxical situation from which an individual cannot escape because of contradictory rules.
Perhaps not the world created by Joseph Heller in his satirical classic Catch-22, which has moved from page to stage in an inventive new version which is heading for the Playhouse this month.
No, everything about Catch-22 puts the ball firmly in the court of the director (in this case the American Rachel Chavkin - well done to her), the actors (nine of them playing a multitude of parts) and the creative folk around them.
University of Arkansas startup Picasolar and Catch-22 from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock took home the top overall prizes Wednesday at the 2013 Donald W.
Sometimes it seems as though life has become more than a Catch-22.
On September 16, 2009, ex-soldier and former diplomat Rory Stewart, who walked across Afghanistan in early 2002 months after the US invasion, laid out what might well be the primary military Catch-22 scenario of the 21st Century:
Oil & Gas Sector Dominance Has Created a Potentially Dangerous Catch-22 Situation
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The Bush administration's reasoning is founded on a twisted form of Catch-22 logic.
For patients, family members, and professionals, Allen (psychiatry, Baylor College of Medicine) explains depression through two concepts: catch-22 and stress pileup.
A bureaucratic Catch-22 causes more problems: New Destiny needs government funds to develop a site, but must take ownership before it can secure the financing.