catechism

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Related to Catechisms: catechesis

cat·e·chism

 (kăt′ĭ-kĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A text summarizing the basic principles of a Christian denomination, usually in question-and-answer form.
b. Formal indoctrination in the tenets of a Christian denomination; catechesis.
2. A manual giving basic instruction in a subject, usually by rote or repetition.
3. A body of fundamental principles or beliefs, especially when accepted uncritically: "The catechism of liberal America was dominated by references to 'freedom,' 'equality,' 'democracy,;rsquo; 'individualism'" (Joseph Ellis).
4. A close questioning or examination, as of a political figure.

[French catechisme, from Old French, from Late Latin catēchismus, from Late Greek katēkhismos, from katēkhizein, to teach by word of mouth; see catechize.]

catechism

(ˈkætɪˌkɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) instruction by a series of questions and answers, esp a book containing such instruction on the religious doctrine of a Christian Church
2. rigorous and persistent questioning, as in a test or interview
[C16: from Late Latin catēchismus, ultimately from Greek katēkhizein to catechize]
ˌcateˈchismal adj

cat•e•chism

(ˈkæt ɪˌkɪz əm)

n.
1. an elementary book containing a summary of the principles of a Christian religion, in the form of questions and answers.
2. catechetical instruction.
3. a series of formal questions used as a test or to elicit views.
[1495–1505; < Late Latin catēchismus <catēch(izāre) to catechize]
cat`e•chis′mal, adj.

catechism

, catechumen - Catechism comes from Latin catechismus, "instruction by word of mouth," and is literally a series of questions and answers; a catechumen is a young Christian preparing for confirmation.
See also related terms for instruction.

catechism

1. a manual of instruction in the principles of the Christian religion, usually in question and answer form.
2. catechetical instruction. — catechist, n. — catechetical, adj.
See also: Christianity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catechism - a series of question put to an individual (such as a political candidate) to elicit their views
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
interrogatory, examination, interrogation - formal systematic questioning
2.catechism - an elementary book summarizing the principles of a Christian religion; written as questions and answers
book - a written work or composition that has been published (printed on pages bound together); "I am reading a good book on economics"

catechism

noun
A set of questions or exercises designed to determine knowledge or skill:
Translations
katechismuskatechizmus
katekismusoverhøring
kátékatekizmus
kennslubók , kverrækileg yfirheyrsla
katekizmassusijęs su katekizmo mokymu
katķismsvirkne jautājumu
katechizm
katechizmus
araştırıcı sorularilmihalsorulu-cevaplı din öğrenim kitabı

catechism

[ˈkætɪkɪzəm] N (= instruction) → catequesis f inv, catequismo m; (= book) → catecismo m

catechism

[ˈkætɪkɪzəm] ncatéchisme m

catechism

n (= instruction)Katechese f; (fig)Verhör nt; (= book)Katechismus m

catechism

[ˈkætɪˌkɪzm] ncatechismo

catechism

(ˈkӕtikizəm) noun
1. a book (especially religious) of instructions by means of question and answer.
2. a series of searching questions on any subject.
catechetical (-ketikl) adjective
catechetical class.
References in classic literature ?
Pearl, therefore -- so large were the attainments of her three years' lifetime -- could have borne a fair examination in the New England Primer, or the first column of the Westminster Catechisms, although unacquainted with the outward form of either of those celebrated works.
These little "solid treatises," as he called them, were sold at the University library under the name of "Historical and Geographic Catechisms.
The gatekeeper was surly, and put him through a catechism, but he insisted that he knew nothing, and as he had taken the precaution to seal his letter, there was nothing for the gatekeeper to do but send it to the person to whom it was addressed.
When a boy, it had been hers to teach him his catechism, mend his clothes, comb his hair, and bring him up generally in the way he should go; and her heart having a warm side to it, Augustine had, as he usually did with most people, monopolized a large share of it for himself, and therefore it was that he succeeded very easily in persuading her that the "path of duty" lay in the direction of New Orleans, and that she must go with him to take care of Eva, and keep everything from going to wreck and ruin during the frequent illnesses of his wife.
The Sunday evening was spent in repeating, by heart, the Church Catechism, and the fifth, sixth, and seventh chapters of St.
Ham Peggotty, who went to the national school, and was a very dragon at his catechism, and who may therefore be regarded as a credible witness, reported next day, that happening to peep in at the parlour-door an hour after this, he was instantly descried by Miss Betsey, then walking to and fro in a state of agitation, and pounced upon before he could make his escape.
Neither, were my notions of the theological positions to which my Catechism bound me, at all accurate; for, I have a lively remembrance that I supposed my declaration that I was to "walk in the same all the days of my life," laid me under an obligation always to go through the village from our house in one particular direction, and never to vary it by turning down by the wheelwright's or up by the mill.
Name your favourite writer" should be one of the first questions in the Engagement Catechism.
And I was a civil, pious boy, and could rattle off my catechism that fast, as you couldn't tell one word from another.
Felicite regretted the noise he made, but soon a new occupation diverted her mind; beginning from Christmas, she accompanied the little girl to her catechism lesson every day.
And all because you've got notions i' your head about religion more nor what's i' the Catechism and the Prayer-book.
As he spoke he pointed his staff at a female figure on the path, in whom Goodman Brown recognized a very pious and exemplary dame, who had taught him his catechism in youth, and was still his moral and spiritual adviser, jointly with the minister and Deacon Gookin.