data

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Related to Categorical data: Numerical data

da·ta

 (dā′tə, dăt′ə, dä′tə)
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1. Facts that can be analyzed or used in an effort to gain knowledge or make decisions; information.
2. Statistics or other information represented in a form suitable for processing by computer.
3. Plural of datum.

[Latin, pl. of datum; see datum.]
Usage Note: The word data is the plural of Latin datum, "something given." In English, most notably in scientific usage, this plural usage is still common, as in this example: "Eventually, his data suggest, a tumor's ... alterations give rise to mutant cells" (Janet Raloff). But data is also standard in denoting a singular mass entity (like information), especially in writing for a more general audience: "Before data is transmitted in bulk around the internet, it is routinely compressed to reduce redundancy" (Richard Dawkins)."Goodall ... wanted to get as much data as possible from her animals before she had to leave them" (Elizabeth Royte). · In our 2005 survey, 66 percent of the Usage Panel accepted the use of data with a singular verb and pronoun in the sentence Once the data is in, we can begin to analyze it. Fully 92 percent accepted the sentence We have very little data on the efficacy of such programs, the same percentage that accepted the use of data as a plural noun. (Note that the quantifier very little, like much in the last quotation given above, is not used with plural nouns such as facts or results.) The percentages in the 2005 survey represent significant increases over those of our 1988 survey, making it safe to say that singular data has become a standard usage.

data

(ˈdeɪtə; ˈdɑːtə)
pl n
1. (Communications & Information) a series of observations, measurements, or facts; information
2. (Computer Science) computing Also called: information the information operated on by a computer program
[C17: from Latin, literally: (things) given, from dare to give]
Usage: Although now often used as a singular noun, data is properly a plural

da•ta

(ˈdeɪ tə, ˈdæt ə, ˈdɑ tə)

n.
1. a pl. of datum.
2. (used with a pl. v.) individual facts, statistics, or items of information.
3. (used with a sing. v.) a body or collection of facts or particulars; information.
usage: data is a plural of datum, orig. a Latin noun meaning “a thing given.” Today, data is used in English both as a plural noun meaning “facts or pieces of information” (These data are described fully on page 8) and as a singular mass noun meaning “information”: The data has been entered in the computer. It is almost always treated as a plural in scientific and academic writing, as a singular or plural elsewhere depending on the context. The singular datum meaning “a piece of information” occurs most frequently in academic or scientific writing.

da·ta

(dā′tə, dăt′ə)
(Used with a singular or plural verb)
1. Information, especially when it is to be analyzed or used as the basis for a decision.
2. Information, usually in numerical form, suitable for processing by a computer.
Usage In scientific writing, data is usually treated as a singular in much the same way as the word information is. We say When the data comes in, we'll understand what happened. But because the word is historically the plural of the Latin noun datum, it is sometimes used as a plural, as in These data do not support your conclusions. The plural use is less frequent than the singular.

data

Representation of facts, concepts, or instructions in a formalized manner suitable for communication, interpretation, or processing by humans or by automatic means. Any representations such as characters or analog quantities to which meaning is or might be assigned.

data

Data is information, usually in the form of facts or statistics that can be analysed.

Such tasks require the worker to process a large amount of data.
This will make the data easier to collect.

Data is usually regarded as an uncountable noun and is used with a singular form of a verb.

2010 is the latest year for which data is available.
The latest data shows that lending fell by 10% in May.

People usually say this data, rather than 'these data'.

Processing this data only takes a moment.

In some formal and scientific writing, data is used with a plural form of a verb, and these data is used instead of 'this data'.

The economic data are inconclusive.
To cope with these data, hospitals bought large mainframe computers.

In other kinds of writing and in conversation, people usually use data as an uncountable noun.

data

Information for a computer to work on. Also, information and results from a computer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.data - a collection of facts from which conclusions may be drawndata - a collection of facts from which conclusions may be drawn; "statistical data"
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
accounting data - all the data (ledgers and journals and spreadsheets) that support a financial statement; can be hard copy or machine readable
metadata - data about data; "a library catalog is metadata because it describes publications"
raw data - unanalyzed data; data not yet subjected to analysis

data

noun information, facts, figures, details, materials, documents, intelligence, statistics, input, gen (Brit. informal), dope (informal), info (informal) The survey was based on data from 2,100 patients.
Usage: From a historical point of view only, the word data is a plural. In fact, in many cases it is not clear from context if it is being used as a singular or plural, so there is no issue: when next needed the data can be accessed very quickly. When it is necessary to specify, the preferred usage nowadays in general language is to treat it as singular, as in: this data is useful to the government in the planning of housing services. There are rather more examples in the Bank of English of these data than this data, with a marked preference for the plural in academic and scientific writing. As regards data is versus data are, the preference for the plural form overall is even more marked in that kind of writing. When speaking, however, it is best to opt for treating the word as singular, except in precise scientific contexts. The singular form datum is comparatively rare in the sense of a single item of data.

data

noun
That which is known about a specific subject or situation:
Translations
data
بياناتبَيَانَاتمُعْطَيات، بَيانات
datainformaceúdaje
datamateriale
datumo
datatiedottieto
נתונים
podacipodatakpodatci
adat
data
staîreyndir, upplÿsingar, gögn
データ事実情報資料
데이터
duomenysduomenų apdorojimasduomenų bankas
datifaktsinformācija
pokynyúdaje
podatekpodatki
податак
data
สถิติ
дані
dữ liệusố liệu

data

[ˈdeɪtə]
A. NPL (with sing or pl vb) → datos mpl
B. CPD data bank Nbanco m de datos
data capture Ngrabación f de datos
data collection Nrecogida f de datos, recopilación f de datos
data dictionary, data directory Nguía f de datos
data entry Nentrada f de datos
data file Narchivo m de datos
data link Nmedio m de transmisión de datos
data management Ngestión f de datos
data preparation Npreparación f de datos
data processing N (= action) → procesamiento m de datos, proceso m de datos; (= science) → informática f
data processor Nprocesador m de datos
data protection Nprotección f de datos
data transmission Ntransmisión f de datos, telemática f

data

[ˈdɑːtə ˈdeɪtə] npldonnées fpldata bank nbanque f de données

data

pl of datum usu with sing vbDaten pl; the actual data is quite surprisingdie eigentlichen Daten sind recht erstaunlich; a piece of dataeine Angabe; (Math) → ein (Zahlen)wert m; we have a significant amount of data on …wir haben einen beträchtlichen Datenbestand über … (+acc)

data

:
data analysis
nDatenanalyse f
data bank
nDatenbank f
database
nDatenbank f; we have a large data of …wir haben große Datenbestände an … (dat); to set up a dataeine Datenbank aufbauen; data managerDatenbankmanager(in) m(f)
data bit
nDatenbit nt
data block
nDatenblock m
data buffer
nDatenpuffer m
data capture
data carrier
nDatenträger m
data collection
data communication
n, data communications
pl (Comput) → Datenkommunikation for -übermittlung f
data file
nDatei f
data-handling system
nDatenerfassungssystem nt
data input
nDateneingabe f
data medium
n (Comput) → Datenträger m
data network
nDatennetz nt
data pen
n (Comput) → Lichtgriffel or -stift m
data processing
data protection
nDatenschutz m
data protection act
data rate
nDatenrate f
data retrieval
nDatenabruf m
data switch
nDatenschalter m
data switching
nDatenvermittlung f
data transfer
nDatentransfer m
data transmission

data

[ˈdeɪtə] nsg or pldati mpl

data

(ˈdeitə) , (daːtə) noun plural
or noun singular facts or information (especially the information given to a computer). All the data has/have been fed into the computer.
ˈdatabase noun
(also ˈdata-bank) a large amount of information which is stored in a computer.
ˌdata-ˈprocessing noun
the handling and processing of information by computer.

data

بَيَانَات data data Daten δεδομένα datos tiedot données podaci dati データ 데이터 gegevens data dane dados данные data สถิติ veri số liệu 数据

da·ta

n., pl. datos, datos de información.

data

n o npl datos, información f
References in periodicals archive ?
Categorical data like gender and colono- scopic findings were analyzed by their fre- quencies and percentages.
The categorical data was analyzed as frequencies and percentages while numerical data (age in years) was analyzes as mean SD minimum maximum and range.
Incomplete categorical data design; non-randomized response techniques for sensitive questions in surveys.
However, later developments extended these models for the analysis of categorical data and the mean structure (Joreskog & Sorbom, 2001).
Conclusion: Multiple correspondence analyses were suitable choices to determine detailedresults of complex categorical data in migraine risk factors.
This last task is accomplished by a simple Edit/Inset command followed by specifying the levels of the categorical data variable.
Baseline clinical characteristics of patients with or without subsequent restenosis Variables Patients with Patients without restenosis (n=6) restenosis (n=9) p * Age, years 57+10 59+13 59(46-72) 61 (45-76) ns Male gender, n (%) 5(83) 8(88) ns Diabetes, n (%) 1(16) 1(11) ns Hyperlipidemia, n (%) 4(66) 7(77) ns Smoking, n (%) 4(66) 8(88) ns Continuous data are expressed as median (minimum-maximum) and mean [+ or -] SD values Categorical data are expressed as numbers (percentage) * Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests,.
of Ballarat) gently introduce the basic concepts of measurement, probability, data management, descriptive statistics and graphics, research design, the art of critiquing the statistics presented by others, inferential statistics, the t-test, the correlation coefficient, categorical data, nonparametric statistics, the general linear model, extensions of analysis of variance, multiple linear regression and other types of regression, and applications in business, quality improvement, medicine, epidemiology, education and psychology.
Although the file contains both quantitative and categorical data, this article focuses on investigations that involve the categorical data.
Baseline outcome variables and within-group changes from baseline were compared using Fisher's exact test for categorical data and the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous data.
It describes basic concepts in epidemiology and statistics, including causality, sample size, power, probability sampling, measures of frequency and association, and disease surveillance and screening; epidemiologic study designs (descriptive, analytic, and experimental); statistical techniques and epidemiologic applications, such as statistical models, general linear models, and categorical data and analysis; and special topics like nonparametric methods, life tables, and survival analysis.
The topics include a false discovery rate procedure for categorical data, modeling survival data using the piecewise exponential model with random time grid, efficient algorithms for a Bayesian binary regression model with skew-probit link, comparative genomic analysis using information theory, and using latent class analysis in medical diagnosis.