catechism

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cat·e·chism

 (kăt′ĭ-kĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A text summarizing the basic principles of a Christian denomination, usually in question-and-answer form.
b. Formal indoctrination in the tenets of a Christian denomination; catechesis.
2. A manual giving basic instruction in a subject, usually by rote or repetition.
3. A body of fundamental principles or beliefs, especially when accepted uncritically: "The catechism of liberal America was dominated by references to 'freedom,' 'equality,' 'democracy,;rsquo; 'individualism'" (Joseph Ellis).
4. A close questioning or examination, as of a political figure.

[French catechisme, from Old French, from Late Latin catēchismus, from Late Greek katēkhismos, from katēkhizein, to teach by word of mouth; see catechize.]

catechism

(ˈkætɪˌkɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) instruction by a series of questions and answers, esp a book containing such instruction on the religious doctrine of a Christian Church
2. rigorous and persistent questioning, as in a test or interview
[C16: from Late Latin catēchismus, ultimately from Greek katēkhizein to catechize]
ˌcateˈchismal adj

cat•e•chism

(ˈkæt ɪˌkɪz əm)

n.
1. an elementary book containing a summary of the principles of a Christian religion, in the form of questions and answers.
2. catechetical instruction.
3. a series of formal questions used as a test or to elicit views.
[1495–1505; < Late Latin catēchismus <catēch(izāre) to catechize]
cat`e•chis′mal, adj.

catechism

, catechumen - Catechism comes from Latin catechismus, "instruction by word of mouth," and is literally a series of questions and answers; a catechumen is a young Christian preparing for confirmation.
See also related terms for instruction.

catechism

1. a manual of instruction in the principles of the Christian religion, usually in question and answer form.
2. catechetical instruction. — catechist, n. — catechetical, adj.
See also: Christianity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.catechism - a series of question put to an individual (such as a political candidate) to elicit their views
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
interrogatory, examination, interrogation - formal systematic questioning
2.catechism - an elementary book summarizing the principles of a Christian religion; written as questions and answers
book - a written work or composition that has been published (printed on pages bound together); "I am reading a good book on economics"

catechism

noun
A set of questions or exercises designed to determine knowledge or skill:
Translations
katechismuskatechizmus
katekismusoverhøring
kátékatekizmus
kennslubók , kverrækileg yfirheyrsla
katekizmassusijęs su katekizmo mokymu
katķismsvirkne jautājumu
katechizm
katechizmus
araştırıcı sorularilmihalsorulu-cevaplı din öğrenim kitabı

catechism

[ˈkætɪkɪzəm] N (= instruction) → catequesis f inv, catequismo m; (= book) → catecismo m

catechism

[ˈkætɪkɪzəm] ncatéchisme m

catechism

n (= instruction)Katechese f; (fig)Verhör nt; (= book)Katechismus m

catechism

[ˈkætɪˌkɪzm] ncatechismo

catechism

(ˈkӕtikizəm) noun
1. a book (especially religious) of instructions by means of question and answer.
2. a series of searching questions on any subject.
catechetical (-ketikl) adjective
catechetical class.
References in periodicals archive ?
com, citing The Cathechism, explained, as in the case of divorcees, "a new union cannot be recognized as valid, if the first marriage was.
CATHECHISM OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH [section] 1955, at 474 (2d ed.
Three contributions suggest these connections: Myra Orth, "Reconsidering Radical Beauty: Marguerite de Navarre's Illuminated Evangelical Cathechism," Diane Desrosiers-Bonin, "L'Epistre de Marie d'Ennetieres et les dedicaces evangeliques offertes a la famille royale avant 1540," and James P.
Presumably, Protestant students would be exempt from any cathechism [sic] classes, and attendance at Mass.
She emphasizes, as David Downes often has done in the past, that, unfortunately for him (at least in some senses), Hopkins the committed Scotist studied theology during an era when theological Thomism (and a particularly self-defensive brand of Thomism) ruled theological schools and, by extension, cathechism classes.