Roman Catholic Church

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Roman Catholic Church

n.
The Christian church characterized by an episcopal hierarchy with the pope as its head and belief in seven sacraments and the authority of tradition.

Roman Catholic Church

n
(Roman Catholic Church) the Christian Church over which the pope presides, with administrative headquarters in the Vatican. Also called: Catholic Church or Church of Rome

Ro′man Cath′olic Church′


n.
the Christian church of which the pope, or bishop of Rome, is the supreme head.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Roman Catholic Church - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchyRoman Catholic Church - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
indulgence - the remission by the pope of the temporal punishment in purgatory that is still due for sins even after absolution; "in the Middle Ages the unrestricted sale of indulgences by pardoners became a widespread abuse"
Divine Office - canonical prayers recited daily by priests (e.g. the breviary of the Roman Catholic Church)
Little Office - a Roman Catholic office honoring the Virgin Mary; similar to but shorter than the Divine Office
Office of the Dead - an office read or sung before a burial mass in the Roman Catholic Church
placebo - (Roman Catholic Church) vespers of the office for the dead
confession - (Roman Catholic Church) the act of a penitent disclosing his sinfulness before a priest in the sacrament of penance in the hope of absolution
beatification - (Roman Catholic Church) an act of the Pope who declares that a deceased person lived a holy life and is worthy of public veneration; a first step toward canonization
canonisation, canonization - (Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints
Mass - (Roman Catholic Church and Protestant Churches) the celebration of the Eucharist
novena - a Roman Catholic devotion consisting of prayers on nine consecutive days
Stations, Stations of the Cross - (Roman Catholic Church) a devotion consisting of fourteen prayers said before a series of fourteen pictures or carvings representing successive incidents during Jesus' passage from Pilate's house to his crucifixion at Calvary
ostensorium, monstrance - (Roman Catholic Church) a vessel (usually of gold or silver) in which the consecrated Host is exposed for adoration
pallium - (Roman Catholic Church) vestment consisting of a band encircling the shoulders with two lappets hanging in front and back
ultramontanism - (Roman Catholic Church) the policy that the absolute authority of the church should be vested in the pope
sursum corda - (Roman Catholic Church) a Latin versicle meaning `lift up your hearts'
breviary - (Roman Catholic Church) a book of prayers to be recited daily certain priests and members of religious orders
missal - (Roman Catholic Church) a book containing all the prayers and responses needed to celebrate Mass throughout the year
Vulgate - the Latin edition of the Bible translated from Hebrew and Greek mainly by St. Jerome at the end of the 4th century; as revised in 1592 it was adopted as the official text for the Roman Catholic Church
Paternoster - (Roman Catholic Church) the Lord's Prayer in Latin; translates as `our father'
Mass card - (Roman Catholic Church) a card sent to a bereaved family that says the sender has arranged for a Mass to be said in memory of the deceased
spiritual bouquet - (Roman Catholic Church) a card indicating that the sender will perform certain devotional acts on behalf of another
kiss of peace, pax - (Roman Catholic Church) a greeting signifying Christian love for those assisting at the Eucharist
Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, Immaculate Conception - (Christianity) the Roman Catholic dogma that God preserved the Virgin Mary from any stain of original sin from the moment she was conceived
gradual - (Roman Catholic Church) an antiphon (usually from the Book of Psalms) immediately after the epistle at Mass
Catholic Church - any of several churches claiming to have maintained historical continuity with the original Christian Church
Rome - the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church
Curia - (Roman Catholic Church) the central administration governing the Roman Catholic Church
College of Cardinals, Sacred College - (Roman Catholic Church) the body of cardinals who advise the Pope and elect new Popes
Rota - (Roman Catholic Church) the supreme ecclesiastical tribunal for cases appealed to the Holy See from diocesan courts
Roman Catholic - a member of the Roman Catholic Church
apostolic delegate - (Roman Catholic Church) a representative of the Holy See in a country that has no formal diplomatic relations with it
bishop - a senior member of the Christian clergy having spiritual and administrative authority; appointed in Christian churches to oversee priests or ministers; considered in some churches to be successors of the twelve Apostles of Christ
Brother - (Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a monk and used as form of address; "a Benedictine Brother"
cardinal - (Roman Catholic Church) one of a group of more than 100 prominent bishops in the Sacred College who advise the Pope and elect new Popes
dean - (Roman Catholic Church) the head of the College of Cardinals
Doctor of the Church, Doctor - (Roman Catholic Church) a title conferred on 33 saints who distinguished themselves through the orthodoxy of their theological teaching; "the Doctors of the Church greatly influenced Christian thought down to the late Middle Ages"
domestic prelate - (Roman Catholic Church) a priest who is an honorary member of the papal household
internuncio - (Roman Catholic Church) a diplomatic representative of the Pope ranking below a nuncio
Monsignor - (Roman Catholic Church) an ecclesiastical title of honor bestowed on some priests
References in classic literature ?
I will simply call your attention to the fact that your modern systems of popular election, of two chambers, and of juries all had their origin in provincial and oecumenical councils, and in the episcopate and college of cardinals; but there is this difference,--the views of civilization held by our present-day philosophy seem to me to fade away before the sublime and divine conception of Catholic communion, the type of a universal social communion brought about by the word and the fact that are combined in religious dogma.
By a species of pious fraud, for which no doubt the worthy priest found his absolution in the purity of his motives, he declared that, while no positive change was actually wrought in the mind of Middleton, there was every reason to hope the entering wedge of argument had been driven to its head, and that in consequence an opening was left, through which, it might rationally be hoped, the blessed seeds of a religious fructification would find their way, especially if the subject was left uninterruptedly to enjoy the advantage of catholic communion.
It was rumoured of him once that he was about to join the Roman Catholic communion, and certainly the Roman ritual had always a great attraction for him.
Moreover, the Northeast Catholic Community of Delhi (NECCOD) statement's expressed its shocked, pained and disturbed by the inhuman behaviour of the villagers of Leingangching, Ukhrul disEeA[degrees]trict, Manipur, wherein a deceased lady late Mrs Rita Haorei was denied honourEeA[degrees]able burial in her own land simply because she was a Christian belonging to the Catholic Communion.
It reveals an unjust caricature of the experience of divorced and remarried people committed to following Jesus within the Catholic communion.
Tillard, while drawing richly from scripture, patristics, ecumenical literature, and his interdenominational ecumenical experiences, wrote decidedly for the Catholic communion.
Today, Catholic priests who have left the clerical state to marry, Catholic priests who have joined (or have been ordained in) the Ecumenical Catholic Communion, Roman Catholic Women Priests and the Orthodox Church all have valid ordinations and apostolic succession--and all welcome the remarried to Communion--as do Protestant churches that serve Communion.
Of course, the issue at Notre Dame isn't whether Obama, a Protestant, should be welcomed to a Catholic Communion rail.
55, 21); thus he is the guardian of the catholicity of his local Church, and must be always careful to promote catholic communion with other churches.
The Church of England has turned its back on its faithful to tear itself to pieces over gay clergymen while the Catholic communion listens in disbelief at the Vatican's insistence that condom use, even in Africa where Aids stalks, remains forbidden.
Three of them had already been ordained invalidly by a member of the Old-Catholic church, a schismatic branch of the Catholic Church, which, after accepting female priests some years ago, is now heretical as well as schismatic and, therefore, no longer part of the Catholic communion.
And it seems to me we have to make a distinction: If a Catholic deliberately, obstinately, publicly renounces a dogmatic teaching of the church, we do not say they are outside the purview of God's loving care and concern, but I think we have to say they have separated themselves from the Roman Catholic communion.

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