Catholicism


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Ca·thol·i·cism

 (kə-thŏl′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
The faith, doctrine, system, and practice of a Catholic church, especially the Roman Catholic Church.

Catholicism

(kəˈθɒlɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) short for Roman Catholicism
2. (Roman Catholic Church) the beliefs, practices, etc, of any Catholic Church

Ca•thol•i•cism

(kəˈθɒl əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the faith, system, and practice of a Catholic church, esp. the Roman Catholic Church.
2. (l.c.) catholicity.
[1600–10]

Catholicism


Heckerism.
the praetiees in the Anglican communion that hold that Catholicism is inherent in a church whose episcopate is able to traee its line of descent from the apostles and whose faith Catholics agree to be revealed truth. — AngloCatholic, n., adj.
an opposition to the influence and activities of the clergy in public affairs. — anticlericalist, n.
a book containing the prayers, lessons, etc., needed by a priest for the reading of his daily office.
a 19th-century plan of the German parliamentarian Cahensly, successfully opposed by American interests, to have the pope divide the foreign-born population of the U.S. into ethnic groups and to appoint bishops and priests of the same ethnic and linguistic background as each group.
the condition of a person who is receiving basic instruction in the doctrines of Christianity in preparation for the sacrament of confirmation. Also catechumenate. — catechumen, n. — catechumenal, catechumenical, adj.
the state of being single or unmarried, especially in the case of one bound by vows not to marry. — celibate, n., adj.
1. a sacramental oil.
2. a sacramental anointing; unction.
3. Eastern Christianity. the rite of confirmation.
1. an undue influence of the hierarchy and clergy in public affairs and government.
2. the principles and interests of the clergy.
3. the system, spirit, or methods of the priesthood; sacerdotalism. Cf. laicism. — clericalist, n.
1. the philosophy and methods of the ultramontane party in the Roman Church.
2. the methods and processes of the Curia Romana, the bureaucracy of congregations and offices which assist the pope in the government of the Roman Church.
1. a canon lawyer versed in papal decrees on points in ecclesiastical law.
2. a person versed in the decretals. Also decretalist.
the devotion, veneration, or respect accorded saints.
the control of government by clerics. Also called hierocracy. — ecclesiarch. n.
a letter from the Pope to the Roman Catholic clergy on matters of doctrine or other concerns of the Church, of ten meant to be read from the pulpit.
the view that the faith and practice of the Church are based in both tradition and the Scriptures. See also bible.
the body of doctrines, chiefly associated with French dioceses, advocating the restriction of papal authority, especially in administrative matters. Cf. ultramontanism. — Gallican, n., adj.
the teaching of a 19th-century Paulist priest, Isaac T. Hecker, who regarded Catholicism as the religion best suited to promoting human aspirations after liberty and truth and to the character and institutions of the American people. Also called Americanism.
ecclesiarchy.
the views of Hildebrand, Pope Gregory VII (1073-85), especially those underlying his drastic reforms within the Roman Church and his assertion of papal supremacy. Usually called ultramontanism. — Hildebrandic, Hildebrandine, adj.
permission, particularly that given by the Roman Catholic Church, to publish or print; hence, any sanction or approval. (Latin: ‘let it be printed.’)
1. the belief in or adherence to the dogma of papal infallibility.
2. the dogma itself.
1. the doctrines, practices, etc., of the Jesuit order of priests.
2. Disparaging, lower case. casuistry or equivocation. Also Jesuitry. — Jesuitic, Jesuitical, adj.
1. the nonclerical, or secular, control of political and social institutions in a society.
2. lay participation in church matters. Cf. clericalism. — laity, n.
a believer in the theological doctrines of St. Alfonso Maria da Liguori (1696-1787), founder of the Redemptorist Order.
Rare. a religious cult based on the veneration of the Virgin Mary.
the cult of the Blessed Virgin Mary. — Mariolater, n. — Mariolatrous, adj.
an Arabic-speaking Uniat sect in Lebanon, under the authority of the papacy since the 12th century but maintaining its Syriac liturgy, married clergy, and practice of communion in both bread and wine. — Maronite, n., adj.
the forced conversion of Jews or Moors in medieval Spain. — marrano, n.
martyrology
1. a history or registry of martyrs.
2. the branch of ecelesiastical history that studies the lives and deaths of martyrs.
3. an official catalog of martyrs and saints, arranged according to the dates of their feast days. — martyrologist, n.martyrologic, martyrological, adj.
the doctrine of the 16th-century Jesuit Luis Molina, who taught that the work of grace depends on the accord of man’s free will. — Molinist, n.
a Premonstrant.
a 3rd-century controversy in the Roman diocese in which Novation, elected bishop of a schismatic group, declared that lapsed Christians could not be received again into the Church. — Novationist, n.
a person resident and serving in a monastery but not under vows; a lay religious worker.
1. a member of the lowest-ranking of the four minor orders in Roman Catholicism.
2. a doorkeeper of a church.
1. the institution and procedures of papal government.
2. the advocacy of papal supremacy. — papalist, n., adj.
Usually disparaging. authoritarian government under the direction of the pope. Also papistry. — papist, n. — papistic, papistical, adj.
the theological concepts taught by or ascribed to St. Peter. — Petrinist, n.
Pejorative. papal authority or actions.
a breviary.
a priest who submits a plea for beatification or canonization.
one of the order of Roman Catholic monks founded at Premontre, France, by St. Norbert in 1119. Also called Premonstratensian, Norbertine.
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance. — recusant, n., adj.
advocacy of the reunion of the Anglican and Catholic churches. — reunionist, n.reunionistic, adj.
the principles of the Ribbon Society, a Roman Catholic secret society of the mid 19th century. — Ribbonist, Ribandist, n.
the practices and doctrines of Roman Catholicism. — romanist, n.romanistic, adj.
the system, practices, or principles underlying the priesthood. — sacerdotal, n., adj.
the practice or defense of the selling of church relies, preferments, etc. — simoniac, simonist, n.
a fellowship, brotherhood, or other association of a benevolent nature, especially in the Roman Catholic Church. — sodalist, n., adj.
the state of one who has received supernatural stigmata, i.e., marks on hands, feet, and side similar to the wounds of Christ. — stigmata, n.stigmatic, adj.
a member of a council, meeting to consult and decide on church matters. — synodical, synodal, adj.
adherence to tradition, rather than to revelation, independent Bible study, or individual reasoning, as the authority controlling religious knowledge and practice. — traditionalist, n.traditionalistic, adj.
a member of a Roman Catholic monastic order, a branch of the Cistercians, observing an austere, reformed rule, including a vow of silence; named after the monastery at La Trappe, France, where the reformed rule was introduced in 1664. — Trappist, adj.
the advocacy of the supremacy of the papacy and the papal system, in opposition to those favoring national churches and the authority of church councils. Cf. Gallicanism. — ultramontane, ultramontanist, n.ultramontanistic, adj.
the union of an Eastern Rite church with the Roman Church in which the authority of the papacy is accepted without loss of separate liturgies or government by local patriarchs. — Uniat, Uniate, n.
the doctrine or advocacy of papal supremacy. — Vaticanist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Catholicism - the beliefs and practices of a Catholic ChurchCatholicism - the beliefs and practices of a Catholic Church
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
papism, Roman Catholicism, Romanism - the beliefs and practices of the Catholic Church based in Rome
Eastern Catholicism - the beliefs and practices of any of the eastern Catholic Churches based in Constantinople or Antioch or Alexandria or Moscow or Jerusalem
Translations
الكاثوليكيه
katolicismus
katolicisme
katoličanstvokatolicizam
kaòólska
catolicism
katolicizmus
KatoliklikKatoliklik dini

Catholicism

[kəˈθɒlɪsɪzəm] Ncatolicismo m

Catholicism

[kəˈθɒlɪsɪzəm] ncatholicisme m

Catholicism

Catholicism

[kəˈθɒlɪsɪzm] nCattolicesimo

catholic

(ˈkӕθəlik) adjective
1. wide-ranging in one's taste etc. a catholic taste in books.
2. (with capital) Roman Catholic.
noun
(with capital) a Roman Catholic.
Catholicism (kəˈθolisizəm) noun
Roman Catholicism.
References in classic literature ?
He had never let the fact of her Catholicism trouble him; Catholicism to him was nothing but a name, and to express a mistrust of the form in which her religious feelings had moulded themselves would have seemed to him on his own part a rather pretentious affectation of Protestant zeal.
Why, you wicked man, a cloister implies a monk, and a monk Roman Catholicism.
The arch-heretics of the Middle Ages had already made large incisions into Catholicism.
You think it proves the truth of Roman Catholicism that John Henry Newman wrote good English and that Cardinal Manning has a picturesque appearance?
A man of rank, too, and rich--a man who, if he had continued to serve, might have done anything; and then to throw up the service and everything else in order to go over to Roman Catholicism and turn Jesuit-- openly, too--almost triumphantly.
And as it always happens in contests of cunning that a stupid person gets the better of cleverer ones, Helene- having realized that the main object of all these words and all this trouble was, after converting her to Catholicism, to obtain money from her for Jesuit institutions (as to which she received indications)- before parting with her money insisted that the various operations necessary to free her from her husband should be performed.
The talk meanwhile raced past her, and when Richard suddenly stated in a jocular tone of voice, "I'm sure Miss Vinrace, now, has secret leanings towards Catholicism," she had no idea what to answer, and Helen could not help laughing at the start she gave.
Brooke, who was just then informing him that the Reformation either meant something or it did not, that he himself was a Protestant to the core, but that Catholicism was a fact; and as to refusing an acre of your ground for a Romanist chapel, all men needed the bridle of religion, which, properly speaking, was the dread of a Hereafter.
121] A FRENCH novelist who, with much of Zola's undoubted power, writes always in the interest of that high type of Catholicism which still prevails in the remote provinces of France, of that high type of morality of which the French clergy have nobly maintained the ideal, is worth recommending to the more serious class of English readers.
In 1517 Martin Luther, protesting against the unprincipled and flippant practices that were disgracing religion, began the breach between Catholicism, with its insistence on the supremacy of the Church, and Protestantism, asserting the independence of the individual judgment.
The secret of the strength of Catholicism, and of the deep root that it has taken in the ordinary life of man, lies precisely in this--that it steps in to invest every important event in his existence with a pomp that is so naively touching, and so grand, whenever the priest rises to the height of his mission and brings his office into harmony with the sublimity of Christian doctrine.
She knew little of saints and martyrs, and had gathered, as a general result of her teaching, that they were a temporary provision against the spread of Catholicism, and had all died at Smithfield.