caulis


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caulis

(ˈkɔːlɪs)
n, pl -les (-liːz)
(Botany) rare the main stem of a plant
[C16: from Latin]
References in periodicals archive ?
Its name comes from the Latin words caulis, which means cabbage, and floris, or flower.
He says he would sell "the biggest caulis and cabbages" because of the huge families people would have back then.
In the 1990s, clinical pharmacists in Peking University Hospital reported cases of liver damage due to Zhuang Gu Guan Jie pills and kidney damage due to TCM Caulis aristolochiae manshuriensis through therapeutic drug monitoring and adverse drug reaction monitoring; the hospital was thus able to stop the use of related TCM in a timely manner, thereby reducing the patients' drug risks.
Background: Caulis Lonicerae japonicae (CLJ) is often used for the treatment of inflammation such as acute fever, headache, respiratory infection and epidemic diseases.
Liming the soil helps but you'll probably find you have to grow your cabbages, caulis and sprouts in another area.
The length of bush has also a positive correlation in probable level of 1% with caulis length (0.
Decorate it with a favourite design or a picture of what you are marking - then you'll never get your caulis mixed up with your courgettes.
Cauliculus, diminuitivo di caulis, e termine che afferisce al linguaggio dell'agricoltura e indica propriamente un "parvus frutex herbarum vel arborum" (48), dalla vite alla lattuga alla bietola; tuttavia, nel sermo cotidianus il termine e passato ad indicare metonimicamente la brassica, come in Hor.
Village dairies have glass-front fridges where they store beer, a dollar a can, alongside vegetables brought in by international shipping: apples, oranges, carrots, pumpkin, caulis and cabbage, although these rapidly lose their crisp.
Caulis tetragonis, 2-3 mm crassis, pilis septatis aglandularis, ca.
It doesn't have to be all about cabbage and caulis - there's a treasure chest of exotic edibles capable of surviving and flourishing in the UK," said James.