casualism

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casualism

(ˈkæʒjʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
the doctrine that the existence and occurrence of everything is controlled by chance

casualism

the doctrine that events are ruled by chance.
See also: Chance
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References in periodicals archive ?
Causalism and Intentional Omission, JOSHUA SHEPHERD
This paper considers the prospects for causalism about intentional omission, examining two recent proposals.
See Chapter 4 especially, as well as comments in the conclusion, on the shift from moralism towards causalism (337-38).
Crossing successfully is possible only with a willingness to enter an alien land alone, unaccompanied by our familiar accoutrements of causalism, naturalism, moralism, personalism, temporalism, voluntarism, humanism, positivism, literalism.
I think we, as nursing scientists, will achieve greater regard for our unique contributions and we can more clearly focus our research resources if we clearly discern between two very different alternatives to causalism and align ourselves clearly with the one most favorable to ourselves and our work.
conceptual systemization of the factual, informative input of sensible experience), which, in keeping with horizontal causalism, serves to abstract general patterns from sensible particulars or to reduce holistic experience to sensible parts or quantitative processes seen as somehow causally prior to yet constitutive of that experience.
Non-anglophone authors also may incorrectly "translate" a noun into an apparently English equivalent, perhaps writing, "His work was on the causalism [from French] of infectious diseases" rather than "His work was on the etiology [English medical term] of infectious diseases.
Moralism gives way to causalism as scientific research enthrones necessity above volition.
And she devotes exactly two paragraphs to the question, leaving the debate over causalism about reasons for action and reason explanations of action to be considered elsewhere.
But it is not genetic description in general which is disqualified, but only the genetic description which borrows its schemas from naturalism and causalism, and depends upon a science of "facts" and therefore on an empiricism; and therefore, concludes Husserl, depends upon a relativism incapable of insuring its own truth; therefore, on a scepticism.
Critics of causalism such as defenders of teleological theories of reasons-explanations may welcome Lowe's claim.
This paper argues against causalism about reasons in three stages.