caustic

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caus·tic

 (kô′stĭk)
adj.
1. Capable of burning, corroding, dissolving, or eating away by chemical action.
2. Sarcastic or cutting; biting: "The caustic jokes ... deal with such diverse matters as political assassination, talk-show hosts, medical ethics" (Frank Rich).
3. Given to making caustic remarks: a caustic TV commentator.
n.
1. A caustic material or substance.
2. A hydroxide of a light metal.
3. The enveloping surface formed by light rays reflecting or refracting from a curved surface, especially one with spherical aberration.

[Middle English caustik, from Latin causticus, from Greek kaustikos, from kaustos, from kaiein, kau-, to burn.]

caus′ti·cal·ly adv.
caus·tic′i·ty (kô-stĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

caustic

(ˈkɔːstɪk)
adj
1. (Chemistry) capable of burning or corroding by chemical action: caustic soda.
2. sarcastic; cutting: a caustic reply.
3. (General Physics) of, relating to, or denoting light that is reflected or refracted by a curved surface
n
4. (General Physics) Also called: caustic surface a surface that envelops the light rays reflected or refracted by a curved surface
5. (General Physics) Also called: caustic curve a curve formed by the intersection of a caustic surface with a plane
6. (Chemistry) chem a caustic substance, esp an alkali
[C14: from Latin causticus, from Greek kaustikos, from kaiein to burn]
ˈcaustical adj
ˈcaustically adv
causticity, ˈcausticness n

caus•tic

(ˈkɔ stɪk)

adj.
1. capable of burning, corroding, or destroying living tissue.
2. severely critical or sarcastic: a caustic remark.
n.
3. a caustic substance, as potassium hydroxide.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin causticus < Greek kaustikós=kaust(ós) burnt, v. adj. of kaíein to burn + -ikos -ic]
caus′ti•cal•ly, adv.
caus•tic′i•ty (-ˈstɪs ɪ ti) n.

caustic

Describes an alkaline substance which burns or corrodes organic material
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.caustic - any chemical substance that burns or destroys living tissue
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
lye - a strong solution of sodium or potassium hydroxide
silver nitrate - a nitrate used in making photographic emulsions; also used in medicine as a cautery and as a topical antibacterial agent
Adj.1.caustic - harsh or corrosive in tonecaustic - harsh or corrosive in tone; "an acerbic tone piercing otherwise flowery prose"; "a barrage of acid comments"; "her acrid remarks make her many enemies"; "bitter words"; "blistering criticism"; "caustic jokes about political assassination, talk-show hosts and medical ethics"; "a sulfurous denunciation"; "a vitriolic critique"
unpleasant - disagreeable to the senses, to the mind, or feelings ; "an unpleasant personality"; "unpleasant repercussions"; "unpleasant odors"
2.caustic - of a substance, especially a strong acid; capable of destroying or eating away by chemical action
destructive - causing destruction or much damage; "a policy that is destructive to the economy"; "destructive criticism"

caustic

adjective
1. burning, corrosive, corroding, astringent, vitriolic, acrid, mordant This substance is caustic; use gloves when handling it.
2. sarcastic, biting, keen, cutting, severe, stinging, scathing, acrimonious, pungent, vitriolic, trenchant, mordant He was well known for his abrasive wit and caustic comments.
sarcastic loving, kind, pleasing, soft, sweet, gentle, pleasant, mild, soothing, bland, agreeable, temperate

caustic

adjective
Translations
حارِقٌ، لاسِعٌلاذِعٌ، جارِحٌ، ساخِرٌ
žíravýjízlivýsarkastickýsžíravýžíravina
ætsendebidendetærende
ivallinenpurevasyövyttävä
ætiefnistingandi, meinyrtur
kandžiaikaustinis
assdzēlīgskodīgs
leptavýžieravý
acı ve dokunaklıkostikyakıcı

caustic

[ˈkɔːstɪk]
A. ADJ
1. (Chem) → cáustico
2. (fig) [remark etc] → mordaz, sarcástico
B. CPD caustic soda Nsosa f cáustica

caustic

[ˈkɔːstɪk] adj [wit, remark] → caustique

caustic

adj (Chem) → ätzend, kaustisch; (fig)ätzend; remarkbissig; he was very caustic about the projecter äußerte sich sehr bissig über das Projekt

caustic

[ˈkɔːstɪk] adj (Chem) (fig) → caustico/a

caustic

(ˈkoːstik) adjective
1. burning by chemical action. caustic soda.
2. (of remarks) bitter or sarcastic. caustic comments.
ˈcaustically adverb

caus·tic

a. cáustico-a.

caustic

adj cáustico
References in classic literature ?
Her new clothes were the subject of caustic comment.
Would he obtain air by chemical means, in getting by heat the oxygen contained in chlorate of potash, and in absorbing carbonic acid by caustic potash?
The young count, witty and caustic, passed all the world in review; the queen herself was not spared, and Cardinal Mazarin came in for his share of ridicule.
said Doctor Clarke; and, moved by a deep sense of human weakness, a smile of caustic humor curled his lip even then.
He might have been cured--you should have tried--you should have burnt the wound with a hot iron, or covered it with caustic.
De Wardes, irritated at finding himself dragged away in so abrupt a manner by this Englishman, had sought in his subtle mind for some means of escaping from his fetters; but no one having rendered him any assistance in this respect, he was absolutely obliged, therefore, to submit to the burden of his own evil thoughts and caustic spirit.
One can't hit like that a man who isn't even looking at one; and then, just as I was looking at him swinging his leg with a caustic smile and stony eyes, I felt sorry for the creature.
Boccalini, in his "Advertisements from Parnassus," tells us that Zoilus once presented Apollo a very caustic criticism upon a very admirable book: -- whereupon the god asked him for the beauties of the work.
Each year they gave a round sum to the church, and Martin took caustic gratification in the fact that, although his attitude toward it and religion was well known, he too was counted as one of the fold.
Izz was by nature the sauciest and most caustic of all the four girls who had loved Clare.
She was indolent, passive, the caustic even called her dull; but dressed like an idol, hung with pearls, growing younger and blonder and more beautiful each year, she throned in Mr.
His arguments, it is true, were merely an elaboration of those with which he had favored some of us already; but they were pointed by a concise exposition of the several definite principles they represented, and barbed with a caustic rhetoric quite admirable in itself.