complete blood count

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Related to Cell count: hemocytometer, White blood cell count

complete blood count

n. Abbr. CBC
The determination of the quantity of each type of blood cell in a given sample of blood, often including the amount of hemoglobin, the hematocrit, and the proportions of various white cells.

complete′ blood′ count`


n.
a diagnostic test that determines the exact numbers of each type of blood cell in a fixed quantity of blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complete blood count - counting the number of white and red blood cells and the number of platelets in 1 cubic millimeter of blood
blood count - the act of estimating the number of red and white corpuscles in a blood sample
References in periodicals archive ?
In the other study arm (referred to as the "go group"), subjects immediately begin therapy regardless of CD4 T cell count and remain on antiretroviral therapy (changing regimens as needed to suppress virus) for the duration of the trial.
1) In September 1996, a 74-year-old woman presented with a white blood cell count of 23,000/[micro]l with 57% lymphocytes.
6[degrees] F and his white blood cell count was 14,400/[mm.
If you consider that a cow with a somatic cell count of 400,000 cells/ml could be under-performing by as much as 600 litres a year - and may also be contributing towards a herd cell count that is attracting a penalty - the investment in the right selenium source could be very sound practice indeed.
Myelosuppressive chemotherapy often upsets the patient's white blood cell count, leading to febrile neutropenia.
Provider costs represent a negligible proportion of medical care costs for HIV patients, irrespective of CD4 cell count.
Some studies have also shown that people treated with AZT have smaller increases in CD4 cell count compared with individuals taking alternative NRTIs.
The CD4+ T cell count estimation became an important parameter for monitoring immune deficiency after the discovery of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).
The findings of the retrospective examination of 15 cohort studies indicated that HIV-positive adults whose CD4 cell count was between 251 and 350 cells/[mm.
Cytocentrifuge concentration provides enough nucleated cells to perform a 100-cell differential count if the nucleated cell count is greater than 3/[micro]L.
Barnes, whose leukemia remained chronic for seven years, said he is in hematologic remission, in which his white blood cell count is considered normal.