cell culture

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cell culture

n.
1. The technique or process of growing bacterial or fungal cells or cells derived from tissues of living organisms in a culture medium.
2. A culture of cells grown by this technique or process.
Translations

cell culture

n (Biol) → Zellkultur f
References in periodicals archive ?
As research demands have become increasingly complex, there is a rising need for better 3D cell culture techniques.
However, factors such as strict license and accreditation procedures, complexity in cell culture techniques, and high cost and affordability issues are restraining the global cell and tissue culture supplies market.
Need for developing a cell culture method which can accurately stimulate normal cell morphology, proliferation, differentiation, and migrations led to the development of 3D cell culture techniques.
Following a short chapter on cell culture techniques the book is basically a catalog of the cell lines listed in the front.
These compact, benchtop systems are ideal for fermentation and cell culture techniques typically performed within university teaching labs, research & development facilities of biotech companies, pharmaceutical organisations and food and beverage manufacturers.
Cell culture techniques have become vital to the study of animal cell structure and function and for the production of many important biological materials such as vaccines, hormones, antibodies, enzymes, and nucleic acids.
Cell culture techniques have shaped the scope of biology since the start of the 20th century and are responsible for major advances in biomedicine.
But the 3-D environment isn't always essential, says Bissell, a pioneer of 3-D cell culture techniques.
The simulated digestion and cell culture techniques have been an integral part of Glahn's research since the late 1990s.
The scientists used special cell culture techniques to grow the harvested cells in the laboratory.
However, since human mesenchymal stem cells are normally present at a very low concentration in adult tissues, their numbers must be greatly expanded through cell culture techniques to provide sufficient cells for clinical tissue regeneration.