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 (mōt′l, mō′tīl′)
1. Biology Moving or having the power to move spontaneously: motile spores.
2. Psychology Of or relating to mental imagery that arises primarily from sensations of bodily movement and position rather than from visual or auditory sensations.

[Latin mōtus, motion (from past participle of movēre, to move; see motion) + -ile.]

mo·til′i·ty (mō-tĭl′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motility - ability to move spontaneously and independently
mobility - the quality of moving freely
immotility - lacking an ability to move
2.motility - a change of position that does not entail a change of locationmotility - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
change - the action of changing something; "the change of government had no impact on the economy"; "his change on abortion cost him the election"
abduction - (physiology) moving of a body part away from the central axis of the body
adduction - (physiology) moving of a body part toward the central axis of the body
agitation - the act of agitating something; causing it to move around (usually vigorously)
body English - a motion of the body by a player as if to make an object already propelled go in the desired direction
circumduction - a circular movement of a limb or eye
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
fetal movement, foetal movement - motion of a fetus within the uterus (usually detected by the 16th week of pregnancy)
flit, dart - a sudden quick movement
gesture - motion of hands or body to emphasize or help to express a thought or feeling
headshake, headshaking - the act of turning your head left and right to signify denial or disbelief or bemusement; "I could tell from their headshakes that they didn't believe me"
inclining, inclination - the act of inclining; bending forward; "an inclination of his head indicated his agreement"
everting, eversion, inversion - the act of turning inside out
upending, inversion - turning upside down; setting on end
jerking, jolt, saccade, jerk - an abrupt spasmodic movement
kicking, kick - a rhythmic thrusting movement of the legs as in swimming or calisthenics; "the kick must be synchronized with the arm movements"; "the swimmer's kicking left a wake behind him"
kneel, kneeling - supporting yourself on your knees
pitching, lurch, pitch - abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting"
eye movement - the movement of the eyes
opening - the act of opening something; "the ray of light revealed his cautious opening of the door"
prostration - the act of assuming a prostrate position
reaching, stretch, reach - the act of physically reaching or thrusting out
reciprocation - alternating back-and-forth movement
reclining - the act of assuming or maintaining a reclining position
retraction - the act of pulling or holding or drawing a part back; "the retraction of the landing gear"; "retraction of the foreskin"
retroflection, retroflexion - the act of bending backward
rotary motion, rotation - the act of rotating as if on an axis; "the rotation of the dancer kept time with the music"
closing, shutting - the act of closing something
sitting - the act of assuming or maintaining a seated position; "he read the mystery at one sitting"
posing, sitting - (photography) the act of assuming a certain position (as for a photograph or portrait); "he wanted his portrait painted but couldn't spare time for the sitting"
snap - the act of snapping the fingers; movement of a finger from the tip to the base of the thumb on the same hand; "he gave his fingers a snap"
squatting, squat - the act of assuming or maintaining a crouching position with the knees bent and the buttocks near the heels
sweep - a movement in an arc; "a sweep of his arm"
toss - an abrupt movement; "a toss of his head"
vibration, quivering, quiver - the act of vibrating
wave - a movement like that of a sudden occurrence or increase in a specified phenomenon; "a wave of settlers"; "troops advancing in waves"
flutter, waver, flicker - the act of moving back and forth
standing - the act of assuming or maintaining an erect upright position
straddle, span - the act of sitting or standing astride
stroke - a single complete movement
squirm, wiggle, wriggle - the act of wiggling
eurhythmics, eurhythmy, eurythmics, eurythmy - the interpretation in harmonious bodily movements of the rhythm of musical compositions; used to teach musical understanding


n. movilidad.


n movilidad f, motilidad f; sperm — movilidad or motilidad espermática or de los espermatozoides
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent findings in preclinical studies have indicated that over-expression of HAAH is sufficient to induce cellular transformation, to increase cell motility and invasiveness, and to establish tumor formation in animals.
One of these soluble antibodies showed binding to both full length and catalytic domain of HAAH by ELISA and was capable of inhibiting 90% of cell motility.
Recent studies have indicated that over-expression of HAAH induces cellular transformation, increases cell motility and invasiveness, and causes tumor formation in experimental animals.
The Certified ArrayScan Platform features Cellomics' recent innovations in image analysis including the Target Activation, Morphology Explorer, Extended Neurite Outgrowth, Compartmental Analysis, and Cell Motility BioApplications.
Preclinical studies have indicated that over-expression of HAAH is sufficient to induce cellular transformation, to increase cell motility and invasiveness, and to establish tumor formation in animals.
The cytoskeleton is a complex, dynamic framework that impacts all aspects of cell function including cell division, cell motility, intracellular transport, muscle contractility and regulation of cellular organization.
PuraMatrix provides a number of advantages over current solutions: * Synthetic and transparent yet biocompatible hydrogel composition (1% peptide [w/v] 99% water) * Cultures and supports attachment of most cell and tissue types in highly defined conditions * Supports hepatotoxicity, angiogenesis, stem cell proliferation and tumor cell motility assays * Promotes differentiation of hepatocyte progenitor cells and other cell types
Washington, Feb 13 (ANI): Baylor College of Medicine researchers and collaborators have claimed that the master gene called SRC-3 (steroid receptor coactivator 3) not only enhances estrogen-dependent growth of cancer cells by activating and encouraging the transcription of a genetic message into a protein, it also sends a signal to the cell membrane to promote cell motility or movement - a key element of cancer spread or metastasis.
As such it plays a fundamental role in all aspects of cell mechanics including cell division, intracellular transport, cell motility and the establishment and regulation of cell polarity and organization.
Schlaepfer's research at Scripps focuses on molecular signaling that regulates cell motility and invasion.
It may also prove to be a useful research tool in order to elucidate the mechanisms involved in cell motility.
Spudich's longstanding efforts to further the study of the molecular basis of cell motility through single molecule approaches," said Steven M.