Celticism


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Related to Celticism: Celtic culture

Celt·i·cism

 (kĕl′tĭ-sĭz′əm, sĕl′-)
n.
1. A Celtic custom.
2. A Celtic idiom.
3. A fondness for Celtic culture.

Celticism

1. a word, phrase, or idiom characteristic of Celtic languages in material written in another language.
2. a Celtic custom or usage.
See also: Language
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus he argues that "Joyce's suspicion of Celticism in Ulysses, like his suspicion of Catholicism, was an amplification of the basic instincts of the middle-class Irish, rather than a lone-voice rejection of the middle-class's conventional wisdom" (90).
Nicola Gordon Bowe writes impressively about the visual representation of Celticism during the decade.
She also attends closely to the "cultural and historical specificities" of each text and underscores the influence not just of the Gothic but also of magic realism, Celticism, and Aboriginal and Afro-Caribbean spiritual traditions on the individual workings of haunting and possession.
The concluding essay on race and music is an excellent finish to the book and should be compulsory reading for those who still harbour unexamined racial notions in relation to folk music, including those who trade on the notion of Celticism.
Leersen states that "to the extent that 'Celtic' is an idea with a wide and variable application, Celticism becomes a complex and significant issue in the European history of ideas: the history of what people wanted that term to mean" (3).
He is also unmentioned in recent studies of Revivalist Celticism (for instance, Sinead Garrigan Mattar, Primitivism, Science, and the Irish Revival (Oxford: OUP, 2004) and Gregory Castle, Modernism and the Celtic Revival (Cambridge: CUP, 2001)), albeit they do address aspects of the fairy and folklore culture with which Alfred Perceval Graves was associated.
They consider Ireland's 19th century, Gustave de Beaumont as Ireland's Alex de Tocqueville, John Stuart Mill, Harriet Martineau, Sir Henry Maine and the survival of the fittest, The Irish Question in Karl Marx's and Friedrich Engel's writings on capitalism and empire, the metaphysical unionism of James Anthony Froude, race theory and the Irish, and Macpherson and Matthew Arnold on Celticism and Ireland.
McNeil focuses on the battle between Macpherson's celticism and John Pinkerton's theory of lowland priority.
There were some moments you definitely wouldn't get at a straight jazz gig, such as the hint of New Age Celticism, when Davis played tin whistle (very effectively), or some Japanese mysticism on a number using the haunting shakuhachi flute.
But in New Zealand, the figure of the Maori was also inflected by associated theories of Celticism by Mathew Arnold, Ernest Renan, and the writers of the Celtic Twilight.
In effect, he shifted the focus of the cultural debate by replacing Arnold's politically charged Celticism with his own more neutral brand of neo-primitivism.