Celticist


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Celt·i·cist

 (kĕl′tĭ-sĭst, sĕl′-)
n.
A specialist in Celtic culture or Celtic languages.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Celt, for the Celticist, is vanquished, and Celtic cultures are vanishing.
Such a discussion of the ideological underpinnings of the discipline would have been useful to both the novice and the contemporary outward-looking Celticist to whom this volume will appeal.
Standish James O'Grady's arcadian tract Sun and Wind (1928) is an important text in both utopian and Celticist traditions.
For example, the eminent Celticist John Carey claims that medieval Irish legends about Newgrange recall some of the religious values of those who built the monument four thousand years before.
Hence, Medb, the great queen of Irish saga, represents the achievements of real women rather than the satirical ambiguous figure every other Celticist takes her to be.
Again to mention the parallel from Indo-European studies, no Romanist or Germanist or Celticist or Sanskritist would make proposals about Proto-Romance or Proto-Germanic or Proto-Celtic or Proto-Indic without taking into account what was known or surmised about Proto-Indo-European.
Scholars of language, literature, and other humanities consider Stokes as an individual, as a codifier of Anglo-Indian law and an Irishman living in London and India, and as a Celticist and translator of medieval literature.
Cape Breton Island is thereby repositioned from being a "rural backwater" or, at best, a peripheral outpost of cultural conservatism to what is now a lively and progressive cultural crossroads --a place that seems on its way to becoming what Latour calls an "obligatory passage point" within the transnational networks of Celticist cultural marketing.
Robinson's very mention of Iolo Morganwg would ring alarm bells for any Celticist.
For centuries, evidence of a racial, linguistic, or cultural Celtic-Oriental affinity has been claimed in grammatical texts, genealogies, origin legends, travel narratives, antiquarian studies, Orientalist romances, Celticist studies, and anticolonial critiques.