Central African Federation


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Related to Central African Federation: Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland

Central African Federation

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland
References in periodicals archive ?
1963 - Central African Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland is dissolved.
The policy of partnership pursued in the Central African Federation has been exposed for what it is: the greatest political fraud of our times.
In 1953 Malawi, then known as Nyasaland, became part of the semi-independent Central African Federation (CAF).
Chapter 3 recalls the short-lived course of the Central African Federation (made up of the current nations of Malawi, Zambia, and Zimbabwe), one of the most important political issues of the 1950s (p.
After Kenya, I was able to visit Southern Rhodesia, where I grilled the white prime minister of the Central African Federation, Sir Roy Welensky, on why he thought the Africans there were not fit to be allowed to rule themselves, despite the fact that Africans like them had been ruling themselves successfully in Ghana for a whole five years.
Following his marriage to Nancy, he went to work in what was then the Central African Federation for the Rhodesia Herald at a time of much political unrest.
In 1953 the British government established the Central African Federation, which has been described as "the most controversial large-scale imperial exercise in constructive state-building ever undertaken by the British government.
Latter he was transferred to the Copper Belt and for a while his next-door neighbour was Roy Welensky, later to come to prominence as a leader of the Central African Federation (CAF).
Another diplomat, the Irishman Conor Cruise O'Brien, in his memoirs published in 1998, argued that complicity in the crash extended to the Prime Minister of the Central African Federation, Sir Roy Welensky.
This operation was viewed with mistrust by the black majority and by the Labor Party in Britain, but eventually led in 1953 to the creation of the Central African Federation.
Consciously, if regrettably for readers of this journal, there are no chapters on African nationalism, the politics of the Central African Federation, or the development of the mining industry.
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