cerebralism

cerebralism

(səˈriːbrəlɪzəm; ˈsɛrɪbrəlɪzəm)
n
the theory that physical phenomena arise from the action of the brain
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Like Leroi-Gourhan, Hertz is concerned to out-maneuver a certain cerebralism.
Ernesto Guerra De Cal wrote in his entry that Pessoa 'is the master of intellectual lucidity in the realm of emotion, but beneath the apparent coldness of lyric cerebralism, which at times appears to be a clever game, one detects a sentimental energy that impels the poet toward direct communication, toward the liberation of verbal expression and at times toward irrational intuition' (ed.
Eva's pilgrimage to her grandmother's grave at Babi Yar is far less melodramatic than might be expected, though it is one of the few moments when her overheated cerebralism arrives at cognition of its own impotence.
1) By elaborating on Marinetti's belief in action and violence, his glorification of the machine and his rejection of the past, Ginanni, like other Florentines, cultivated an interest in occultism and dream, but with a cerebralism that was more pronounced.
So events like World Youth Days, with their processions and popular devotions like the rosary, Stations of the Cross, and veneration of the saints, nourish the senses; they are an understandable reaction to postconciliar cerebralism.
Such writers as Maria Ginanni and Irma Valeria, for example, were defined ironically as scrittrici azzurre by other women of the same group, because of their frequent representations of feminine selves transformed into azure expanses, and, mostly, because of their recurrent languishing embellishments and abstract cerebralisms.