Cetshwayo

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Cetshwayo

(Zulu kɛˈtʃwɑːjɒ) or

Cetewayo

n
(Biography) ?1826–84, king of the Zulus (1873–79): defeated the British at Isandhlwana (1879) but was overwhelmed by them at Ulundi (1879); captured, he stated his case in London, and was reinstated as ruler of part of Zululand (1883)
References in periodicals archive ?
Amita Bansal, [1,2,3] Cetewayo Rashid, [1,2,3] Frances Xin, [2,4] Changhong Li, [5] Erzsebet Polyak, [6] Anna Duemler, [1,7] Tom van der Meer, [1,8] Martha Stefaniak, [4] Sana Wajid, 9] Nicolai Doliba, [10] Marisa S.
The supremacy of the Queen Mother, Nqumbazi, over her son, King Cetshwayo, finds expression in Massey's (2007:258) narrative: "When a piece of crewel work bearing the motto, 'God is my King,' was presented to Cetewayo (sic) in London, he at first declined to receive it with the remark, 'There is no one over me but the Queen, my Mother
Which Zulu leader played King Cetewayo in William III) to King Charles I?
For further discussion of Sambourne's racial caricatures see Banta's analysis of his depictions of the Zulu monarch Cetewayo in 1882 and 1883 issues of punch (34-37).
Dinizulu - son of the great Zulu chieftain Cetewayo - was incarcerated for seven years and 6,000 Boers also arrived during the Anglo-Boer War.
Other US Grade 1 winners Cetewayo (1998 Sword Dancer Handicap, 2002 Gulfstream Park Handicap), Fleet Renee (2001 Ashland Stakes, Mother Goose Stakes), A Huevo (2003 Frank J de Francis Memorial Dash), Tapit (2004 Wood Memorial)
Having read the report of the Commission, I think that the boundary line indicated by them must almost necessarily be accepted by us, though I fear it will he most unpopular in the Transvaal; and may encourage Cetewayo to war, from the natural belief of a savage that we only yield from weakness.
The programme has an interview with Chief Buthelezi, who appeared as his own great-uncle, Chief Cetewayo, fighting against the South Wales Borderers in Zulu (1963), which recreated the heroism of Welsh soldiers at Rorke's Drift in 1879.
There were many other plays with imperial content, examples include The Great Mogul, the Nabob's Fortune, The Begum's Diamonds, the Saucy Nabob, The Zulu Chief or Cetewayo at Last, The Cousin from Australia, The Cape Mail, The Diamond Rush, The Raid on the Transvaal, which date from the 1880s and 1890s.
Newspapers were slipped through its mouth telling of how General Gordon was killed by the Mahdi's troops on the steps of the palace in Khartoum in 1885 and how a British army was wiped out by the Zulu imp is of Cetewayo at Isandhlwana six years earlier.
Here is another example of this: `Uncle Remus was a popular holiday gift-book in Shotover's year: when Cetewayo lived in Melbury Road, Arabi Pasha in Egypt, and Spofforth on the Oval' (p.