Cetshwayo


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Cetshwayo

(Zulu kɛˈtʃwɑːjɒ) or

Cetewayo

n
(Biography) ?1826–84, king of the Zulus (1873–79): defeated the British at Isandhlwana (1879) but was overwhelmed by them at Ulundi (1879); captured, he stated his case in London, and was reinstated as ruler of part of Zululand (1883)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1964 movie Zulu, starring Michael Caine (right), the future South African leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi played his own grandfather, Zulu king Cetshwayo kaMpande.
A total of 42 schools were gravely affected and the breakdown per DoE district is as follows: Ugu 12; Umlazi 24; King Cetshwayo 4; Pinetown -1; and 2 uMgungundlovu 1.
The town will see parades, displays and spectacular performances, including King Cetshwayo: The Musical, which portrays the life of King Cetshwayo, leader of the Zulu Kingdom during the Anglo-Zulu war of 1879, through a powerful new musical, featuring live music, traditional shembe dance, projection and storytelling on August 23-25.
The supremacy of the Queen Mother, Nqumbazi, over her son, King Cetshwayo, finds expression in Massey's (2007:258) narrative: "When a piece of crewel work bearing the motto, 'God is my King,' was presented to Cetewayo (sic) in London, he at first declined to receive it with the remark, 'There is no one over me but the Queen, my Mother
But in truth, the British were hell-bent on baiting Zulu king Cetshwayo and his army of 40,000 warriors into battle.
Isandlwana itself is a large, rocky hill and at the foot was where the British commander Lord Chelmsford set up camp when he invaded the Zulu lands - without getting government permission - with around 8,000 men to force Zulu king Cetshwayo to join the confederation.
The 1870s saw a resurgence of the Zulus under their King Cetshwayo.
After many wars of national resistance against British colonialism led by African kings, such as Hintsa, Cetshwayo, Moshoeshoe, Sekukuni and Makado, Britain through its guns over the spears of the African people, seized the African country and handed it over to its colonial settlers.
This is the only known hoard of its kind (15)--all other comparable masses of beads are from elite burials at Mapungubwe and Great Zimbabwe, (16) and later from the royal precincts in the capital towns Mgungundlovu (1828-39) and Ondini (1872-79) of the powerful Zulu chiefs Dingane and Cetshwayo (Van der Merwe et al.
The battle came to be remembered as the single greatest defeat for the British army at the hands of a native army; the Zulu king Cetshwayo led the natives in a vicious attack the British would call a slaughter.
For example, the then-premier of KwaZulu-Natal, S'bu Ndebele, delivered a speech on the legacy of the nineteenth-century Zulu leader Cetshwayo in which he eulogised Fanon as a pivotal figure in African resistance to colonialism.
THE CATASTROPHE was set in motion when Sir Bartle Frere, the British high commissioner, decided that an independent Zululand under King Cetshwayo was an impediment to British interests in the region.